Roosevelts: An American Saga

Note moyenne 4,04
( 252 avis fournis par GoodReads )
 
9780684801407: Roosevelts: An American Saga

Book by Collier Peter

Les informations fournies dans la section « Synopsis » peuvent faire référence à une autre édition de ce titre.

Extrait :

Chapter 1

A remarkable photograph in the Theodore Roosevelt collection at Harvard's Houghton Library shows Abraham Lincoln's funeral procession passing through New York on the way to the train that would complete the long journey home to Illinois. The shot, taken as the procession moved through the Union Square area, captures both the formal solemnity of the occasion and the life of the street. The caisson carrying the coffin has not yet come into view, but an honor guard of infantry in blocky formation follows a straggling line of riders up ahead. People dressed in black line both sides of the street four or five deep. A few of the spectators, hoping to secure a better vantage, have climbed up onto ledges beneath the recessed windows of a commercial building.

There were probably other shots of this scene taken at about the same moment. But in this one the anonymous photographer also captured an arresting accidental detail: two tiny heads poking out of the second-story window of an elegant brownstone. They are six-year-old Theodore Roosevelt and his younger brother, Elliott, four, looking down at the scene below. Their faces are framed by the shutters of the window in a way that suggests a depth of field, thus inviting the eye to enter the dark room behind them, the private world of the Roosevelts.

The brownstone belonged to the boys' grandfather, Cornelius Van Schaack Roosevelt, a great-grandson of Johannes, one of the two founding brothers of the Roosevelt clan, and at the time of Lincoln's death the most prominent member of the family. He was a short man with reddish hair and a large head. (One acquaintance had said of him, "His appearance suggested to me a Hindoo idol roughly carved in red porphyry.") His eyes magnified by thick spectacles, C.V.S., as he was known, was a man of few words whose face wore the stern and inquiring look of a bookkeeper with power. The look was one that had settled on him as a result of a life devoted to the art of the bottom line, but it was probably also congenital. The one moment of frivolity anyone recalled from his childhood occurred one Sunday in his youth when C.V.S. was going home after attending his second church service of the day. He came upon a party of pigs, which ran free in the streets of New York in those days, and on a whim he mounted a huge boar that promptly turned and bolted, carrying him back at full tilt directly into the outraged members of the congregation gathered outside the Dutch Reformed Church he had just left. Those who did not move quickly were bowled over.

Afterward, C.V.S. moved steadily through life establishing a record as a conservative man, thrifty and enterprising. As far as anyone knew, his only other unusual act was becoming the first Roosevelt of his line to marry a non-Dutch woman, a Quaker named Margaret Barnhill. When they were first engaged, he wrote her, "Economy is my doctrine at all times, at all events till I become, if it is to be so, a man of fortune." It was couched as a caveat emptor, but it became a prophecy, the underlined words indicating the emphatic nature of the wish. C.V.S. took the family investment firm, Roosevelt and Son, which had been founded by his grandfather, into new areas of enterprise, making it the largest importer of plate glass in the city. He also bought up land all over Manhattan during the Panic of 1837. Five years later he was worth $250,000, and three years after that his net worth had doubled. In 1868 when a newspaper listed the names of Manhattan's handful of millionaires, the name Cornelius Van Schaack Roosevelt was among them.

Although a man of the new age, C.V.S. tried to maintain the old ways where his family was concerned, bringing his five boys into his business and reminding them of their heritage. (When TR, nearly fifty, visited Africa in 1909 and recited a Dutch rhyme for a contingent of Boers he met there, it was a fragment he had retained from Sunday afternoons with his grandfather.) He was, in a sense, the last Dutch Roosevelt.

The sons of C.V.S. were such energetic youngsters that family and friends began referring to their mother as "that lovely Mrs. Roosevelt with those five horrid boys." They spoke a language all their own. As Silas, the oldest of the boys, said later on, "A Stranger must be somewhat scandalized by the sudden fits we take of irony, cordiality...sense and nonsense, which succeed each other without apparent connection or warning approach."

All of the sons of C.V.S. had acquired their father's gravity by the time they went forth into the world. All had significant achievements as lawyers and businessmen, directors of banks and railroads. One of them, Robert Barnwell Roosevelt, was a writer, newspaper editor, and politician, who changed his middle name from Barnhill to escape jokes about manure when he ran for and was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. He fought Boss Tweed and became a pioneering conservationist. But it was Theodore, youngest of the boys (and later called the first Theodore Roosevelt to distinguish him from his more famous son), who strayed furthest from his father's expectations.

Like his brothers, Theodore stopped off to see his mother every morning on his way to work and joined his father for dinner every Saturday evening. If he was different from the others, it was because he was less adept at making money and less interested in extending the reach of the family business. As the youngest, he had more latitude to explore personal values. He traveled widely at home and abroad. Unwilling to look at the world through plate glass, he began while still young to do volunteer work in New York charities, which provided him with a clear view of the social disorganization caused by the sudden glut of immigrants and the pell-mell urbanization remaking the city. Without knowing it at the time, he had stumbled on what became his life's calling.

Perhaps influenced by the "inner light" of his mother's Quaker background, Theodore had a "troublesome conscience" of his own that not only drew him to social problems but also made him more anxious to give money away than make it. Made wealthy by the hard work of C.V.S., Theodore made the transition from business to philanthropy while still in his thirties, becoming one of a small group of men who founded the American Museum of Natural History, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and other cultural institutions. But his primary interest was in relieving human misery. He helped begin the Newsboys' Lodging House to benefit thousands of urchins who survived by selling papers, and was deeply involved in such organizations as Miss Sattery's Night School for Little Italians.

He wanted to do good, but he was also drawn to the compelling human interest of the netherworld of human suffering he discovered, a world that, if not for his "social work," would have remained as invisible to him as it was to most in his class. "My boys at the Lodging Home were very interesting tonight," he once wrote his son Elliott after spending an evening with the newsboys. "One little fellow eight years old was particularly so, as he had neither father nor mother and felt perfectly able to care for himself. He described how a policeman had 'bringed' him to the Station House once but seemed not quite sure which particular crime it was for."

He was a handsome man, powerfully built with a big head and shaggy beard inevitably described as "leonine." (When still a boy, his son and namesake Teddy, punning on the metaphor, called the first Theodore "a handsome and good natured lion.") He was filled with such charismatic energy that one contemporary referred to him as "a force of nature." There was such an obsessive quality to his philanthropy that a family friend called it a "maniacal benevolence."

The first Theodore would never know the extent to which he had altered individual lives, but almost a quarter century after his death, when his son, then governor of New York, joined some of his colleagues at a conference, Joseph Brady, the governor of Alaska Territory, made a point of seeking him out. While others might greet him as the head of a great state, Brady said, he wanted to shake TR's hand because he was the son of the first Theodore Roosevelt. He went on to describe how as a boy he had been picked up off the streets of New York by TR's father, who placed him in a home in the West, paying for his travel there and periodically checking on his progress as he grew up. The first Theodore Roosevelt, Governor Brady said, had made him who he was.

All the five boys of C.V.S. relied on the women they married for emotional subtlety. Theodore's brother and next-door neighbor Robert (C.V.S. had bought them connected houses at 20th Street and Broadway to keep the family together) had a wife who was a full-fledged eccentric. Elizabeth, or Aunt Lizzy, as the first Theodore's children knew her, kept a menagerie of animals in her enclosed yard, including a cow that had to be carried there in a sling through her living room. There was also a monkey named Topsy that she dressed in brocaded shirts, gold studs, and trousers. Theodore's oldest child, Anna, would remember Topsy as having a "violent temperament," and indeed she once suffered an attack by the monkey while carrying a message through the passageway linking the two houses. Hearing her screams, Aunt Lizzy came running, but was less worried by the teeth marks on the girl's arm than by the emotional trauma possibly suffered by her pet. "Poor Topsy," she cooed, as the monkey stood on top of a dresser chittering angrily and tearing off all the miniature clothes except for the pants, which caught on his tail, thus driving him to even greater rage.

The woman Theodore married would, in time, become almost as peculiar as Aunt Lizzy. She was Martha Bulloch, a Southern belle from Roswell, Georgia. Called Mittie, she was a captivating beauty whose bisque skin nested in thick dark hair. ("Sweet little Dresden China Mother," her son Elliott would call her.) The Bulloch heritage exhaled the antebellum scent of Southern gentility and was exemplified by a Greek Revival plantation home, Bulloch Hall, which some claimed was one of the models for Tara in Margaret Mitchell's Gone with the Wind.

Mittie's forebears on her father's side included a representative to the Continental Congress as well as an assortment of duelists and desperate men. On her mother's side one particularly notable figure was Archibald Stobo, a minister who had migrated to Panama late in the seventeenth century with other Scottish religious dissidents to found the utopian community they intended to call New Caledonia. Eventually the colonists were driven out by the Spanish. Trying to get back to Scotland, they anchored outside Charleston, South Carolina, to take on supplies. Because he was an ordained minister, Stobo was asked to come ashore to perform a marriage. While he was there a violent storm arose, sinking his ship and drowning the other colonists and leaving him beached in a different part of the New World than the one he had set out for. His daughter married one James Bulloch, another Scot newly arrived in America, and they went off to Savannah to live, establishing a family that had, by Mittie's time, become prominent in Georgia's civic life.
ard

In 1850, the first Theodore, then nineteen, traveled to the South and met the Bullochs through an introduction provided by an in-law of his elder brother Silas. Mittie, then fifteen, thought him stuffy; and for his part, Theodore was bothered by the fact that the first face he saw at Bulloch Hall was that of "Toy," the slave about Mittie's age who had slept at the foot of her bed since she was a little girl. After this cool introduction, he saw Mittie again three years later when she was touring the North. In a more hospitable environment, Theodore wooed and won her. When they were married at Bulloch Hall in 1855, Mittie's mother sold four slaves to pay for the wedding.

Returning to New York with her husband, Mittie brought with her a feel for the mythic and grandiose, an imaginative dimension that was not otherwise part of the Roosevelt mentality. It was expressed in the stories she told her children, tales filled with sentimentality and Southern gothic, as well as the derring-do of high adventure.

Her moods oscillated between deep melancholy and febrile gaiety, yet her Roosevelt in-laws quickly learned that it did Mittie an injustice to regard her merely as a vaporish daughter of the South. On one well-remembered occasion the horses pulling her carriage were spooked and bolted, unseating the driver. As the vehicle careened wildly through the streets of New York, bystanders stepped up to try to stop the team but were thrown back. Finally, after a terrifying ride, the horses reached the Roosevelt home, dashed into their stable and ran into a wall in a crash that killed one of the team. By the time servants caught up, Mittie was out of the carriage dusting herself off. "Will you hand me my card case, James?" she coolly asked one of them, as if she had just arrived by plan.

She and Theodore had four children in quick succession, each with nicknames serving almost as clan designations. Anna, who was not only "Bye" but "Bamie" (from bambina), was born in 1855 with the physical deformity of a curved spine but what everyone agreed was a "large soul" that would eventually make her one of the most respected women of the age. Three years later came the future President, Theodore, who was called "Teedie" and sometimes "Thee." Elliott, whom everyone agreed was the sweetest one in the family and who would move through his life with his brother in an odd and tragic pas de deux that defined them both, was "Ellie." In 1861, a year after his birth, came Corinne, or "Conie," the baby of the family, who was both the most sensitive of the Roosevelt children and also the most sentimental.

Friends remarked on how the first Theodore had to baby Mittie almost as much as his children. His uxoriousness, which might otherwise have been just an amusing eccentricity, took on a tragic aspect with the coming of the Civil War. He was caught in the tension between Mittie and his own abolitionist-minded parents. (Mittie's eldest child, Bamie, later said of her mother: "I shudder to think of what she must have suffered...[because] the Roosevelts think they are just but they are hard.") The pleasurable Sunday dinners at the home of C.V.S. became ordeals of silence. On many evenings when Mittie was expected to help entertain her husband's friends and associates, she instead stayed upstairs and ate with the children in the nursery to avoid having to defend once again her Southern sympathies.

Mittie did not simply pine, however. She had brought her mother and sister to live with her in New York, where circumstances forced on them the identity of conspirators. When Theodore was gon...

Présentation de l'éditeur :

Drawing on extensive interviews and brimming with trenchant anecdotes, this historical portrait casts new light on the pivotal events and personalities that shaped the Roosevelt legacy—from Eleanor's often brutal relationship with her children and Theodore Jr.'s undoing in the 1924 New York gubernatorial race, to the heroism of Teddy's sons during both World Wars and FDR's loveless marriage.

The Roosevelts is a brilliant and controversial account of twentieth-century American political culture as seen through the lens of its preeminent political dynasty. Peter Collier shows how Theodore and Franklin Roosevelt, along with their descendants, scrambled to define the direction that American politics would take. The Oyster Bay clan, influenced by the flamboyant Teddy, was extroverted, eccentric, tradition-bound, and family-oriented. They represented an age of American innocence that would be replaced by Franklin's Hyde Park Roosevelts, who were aloof and cold yet individualistic and progressive.

The Roosevelts is history at its most penetrating, a crucial work that illuminates the foundations of contemporary, American politics.

Les informations fournies dans la section « A propos du livre » peuvent faire référence à une autre édition de ce titre.

Meilleurs résultats de recherche sur AbeBooks

1.

Peter Collier
ISBN 10 : 068480140X ISBN 13 : 9780684801407
Neuf(s) Quantité : > 20
Vendeur
BWB
(Valley Stream, NY, Etats-Unis)
Evaluation vendeur
[?]

Description du livre État : New. Depending on your location, this item may ship from the US or UK. N° de réf. du libraire 97806848014070000000

Plus d'informations sur ce vendeur | Poser une question au libraire

Acheter neuf
EUR 14,20
Autre devise

Ajouter au panier

Frais de port : Gratuit
De Etats-Unis vers France
Destinations, frais et délais

2.

Peter Collier, David Horowitz
Edité par SIMON SCHUSTER, United States (1995)
ISBN 10 : 068480140X ISBN 13 : 9780684801407
Neuf(s) Paperback Quantité : 10
Vendeur
The Book Depository US
(London, Royaume-Uni)
Evaluation vendeur
[?]

Description du livre SIMON SCHUSTER, United States, 1995. Paperback. État : New. Reprinted edition. 229 x 155 mm. Language: English . Brand New Book. The story of the Roosevelts is usually seen as a tale of two presidents - Theodore and Franklin - who were distant cousins from distinct worlds, separated by time and politics. And of two families - the Oyster Bay and Hyde Park branches - that had little to do with each other. Now comes an explosive new portrait, The Roosevelts: An American Saga, which offers a completely unique view of America s longest lasting and most powerful dynasty. The Roosevelts were one family, an exclusive elite who began their history intimately related by bonds of love and ambition. In this brilliant biography, we see for the first time how the family divided into two branches and began an epic battle for the family legacy. We see for the first time how the ideals of two presidents were passed on to members of later generations, ennobling some and crushing others. The Roosevelts is a rare look at what brought this exceptional group of people together and what drove them apart. In this riveting book we see Teddy, the flamboyant politician and Rough Rider, who was also a Papa Bear, passing on an ethos of sacrifice and achievement to his cubs. There is Theodore Jr., the crown prince, handpicked by his father to carry on the traditions of Oyster Bay but unable to complete the mission. And Alice, Teddy s acid-tongued and fiercely loyal daughter, whose antics became the talk of Washington and who finally became a caricature, raving against her cousin s New Deal and trying desperately to preserve her father s legacy. There s als Eleanor, daughter of Teddy s tragic brother, Elliott, who translated the unhappiness of her marriage to FDR into political activism, eventually becoming First Lady of the World. And finally there is Franklin, always underestimated by Teddy s family, who made an alliance with Eleanor to become the nemesis of the Oyster Bay Roosevelts and, in the web of ironies that bind this family together, a truer heir to Teddy than any of his own children. Filled with dram. N° de réf. du libraire BZV9780684801407

Plus d'informations sur ce vendeur | Poser une question au libraire

Acheter neuf
EUR 16,93
Autre devise

Ajouter au panier

Frais de port : EUR 1,39
De Royaume-Uni vers France
Destinations, frais et délais

3.

Peter Collier, David Horowitz
Edité par SIMON SCHUSTER, United States (1995)
ISBN 10 : 068480140X ISBN 13 : 9780684801407
Neuf(s) Paperback Quantité : 1
Vendeur
The Book Depository
(London, Royaume-Uni)
Evaluation vendeur
[?]

Description du livre SIMON SCHUSTER, United States, 1995. Paperback. État : New. Reprinted edition. 229 x 155 mm. Language: English . Brand New Book. The story of the Roosevelts is usually seen as a tale of two presidents - Theodore and Franklin - who were distant cousins from distinct worlds, separated by time and politics. And of two families - the Oyster Bay and Hyde Park branches - that had little to do with each other. Now comes an explosive new portrait, The Roosevelts: An American Saga, which offers a completely unique view of America s longest lasting and most powerful dynasty. The Roosevelts were one family, an exclusive elite who began their history intimately related by bonds of love and ambition. In this brilliant biography, we see for the first time how the family divided into two branches and began an epic battle for the family legacy. We see for the first time how the ideals of two presidents were passed on to members of later generations, ennobling some and crushing others. The Roosevelts is a rare look at what brought this exceptional group of people together and what drove them apart. In this riveting book we see Teddy, the flamboyant politician and Rough Rider, who was also a Papa Bear, passing on an ethos of sacrifice and achievement to his cubs. There is Theodore Jr., the crown prince, handpicked by his father to carry on the traditions of Oyster Bay but unable to complete the mission. And Alice, Teddy s acid-tongued and fiercely loyal daughter, whose antics became the talk of Washington and who finally became a caricature, raving against her cousin s New Deal and trying desperately to preserve her father s legacy. There s als Eleanor, daughter of Teddy s tragic brother, Elliott, who translated the unhappiness of her marriage to FDR into political activism, eventually becoming First Lady of the World. And finally there is Franklin, always underestimated by Teddy s family, who made an alliance with Eleanor to become the nemesis of the Oyster Bay Roosevelts and, in the web of ironies that bind this family together, a truer heir to Teddy than any of his own children. Filled with dram. N° de réf. du libraire AAS9780684801407

Plus d'informations sur ce vendeur | Poser une question au libraire

Acheter neuf
EUR 17,37
Autre devise

Ajouter au panier

Frais de port : EUR 1,39
De Royaume-Uni vers France
Destinations, frais et délais

4.

Collier, Peter
Edité par Simon & Schuster
ISBN 10 : 068480140X ISBN 13 : 9780684801407
Neuf(s) PAPERBACK Quantité : 5
Vendeur
Movie Mars
(Indian Trail, NC, Etats-Unis)
Evaluation vendeur
[?]

Description du livre Simon & Schuster. PAPERBACK. État : New. 068480140X Brand New Book. Ships from the United States. 30 Day Satisfaction Guarantee!. N° de réf. du libraire 4837299

Plus d'informations sur ce vendeur | Poser une question au libraire

Acheter neuf
EUR 11,76
Autre devise

Ajouter au panier

Frais de port : EUR 8,79
De Etats-Unis vers France
Destinations, frais et délais

5.

Peter Collier
Edité par Simon & Schuster (1995)
ISBN 10 : 068480140X ISBN 13 : 9780684801407
Neuf(s) Paperback Quantité : 1
Vendeur
Ergodebooks
(RICHMOND, TX, Etats-Unis)
Evaluation vendeur
[?]

Description du livre Simon & Schuster, 1995. Paperback. État : New. N° de réf. du libraire DADAX068480140X

Plus d'informations sur ce vendeur | Poser une question au libraire

Acheter neuf
EUR 7,85
Autre devise

Ajouter au panier

Frais de port : EUR 12,95
De Etats-Unis vers France
Destinations, frais et délais

6.

Peter Collier, David Horowitz
Edité par Simon & Schuster 1995-06-01, New York (1995)
ISBN 10 : 068480140X ISBN 13 : 9780684801407
Neuf(s) paperback Quantité : 1
Vendeur
Blackwell's
(Oxford, OX, Royaume-Uni)
Evaluation vendeur
[?]

Description du livre Simon & Schuster 1995-06-01, New York, 1995. paperback. État : New. N° de réf. du libraire 9780684801407

Plus d'informations sur ce vendeur | Poser une question au libraire

Acheter neuf
EUR 16,95
Autre devise

Ajouter au panier

Frais de port : EUR 4,04
De Royaume-Uni vers France
Destinations, frais et délais

7.

Peter Collier, David Horowitz
Edité par Simon & Schuster
ISBN 10 : 068480140X ISBN 13 : 9780684801407
Neuf(s) Paperback Quantité : 5
Vendeur
THE SAINT BOOKSTORE
(Southport, Royaume-Uni)
Evaluation vendeur
[?]

Description du livre Simon & Schuster. Paperback. État : new. BRAND NEW, The Roosevelts: An American Saga (Reprinted edition), Peter Collier, David Horowitz, The story of the Roosevelts is usually seen as a tale of two presidents - Theodore and Franklin - who were distant cousins from distinct worlds, separated by time and politics. And of two families - the Oyster Bay and Hyde Park branches - that had little to do with each other. Now comes an explosive new portrait, The Roosevelts: An American Saga, which offers a completely unique view of America's longest lasting and most powerful dynasty. The Roosevelts were one family, an exclusive elite who began their history intimately related by bonds of love and ambition. In this brilliant biography, we see for the first time how the family divided into two branches and began an epic battle for the family legacy. We see for the first time how the ideals of two presidents were passed on to members of later generations, ennobling some and crushing others. The Roosevelts is a rare look at what brought this exceptional group of people together and what drove them apart. In this riveting book we see Teddy, the flamboyant politician and Rough Rider, who was also a "Papa Bear, " passing on an ethos of sacrifice and achievement to his "cubs." There is Theodore Jr., the "crown prince, " handpicked by his father to carry on the traditions of Oyster Bay but unable to complete the mission. And Alice, Teddy's acid-tongued and fiercely loyal daughter, whose antics became the talk of Washington and who finally became a caricature, raving against her cousin's New Deal and trying desperately to preserve her father's legacy. There's als Eleanor, daughter of Teddy's tragic brother, Elliott, who translated the unhappiness of her marriage to FDR into political activism, eventually becoming First Lady of the World. And finally there is Franklin, always underestimated by Teddy's family, who made an alliance with Eleanor to become the nemesis of the Oyster Bay Roosevelts and, in the web of ironies that bind this family together, a truer heir to Teddy than any of his own children. Filled with dram. N° de réf. du libraire B9780684801407

Plus d'informations sur ce vendeur | Poser une question au libraire

Acheter neuf
EUR 13,59
Autre devise

Ajouter au panier

Frais de port : EUR 8,02
De Royaume-Uni vers France
Destinations, frais et délais

8.

COLLIER
Edité par Simon and Schuster
ISBN 10 : 068480140X ISBN 13 : 9780684801407
Neuf(s) Quantité : > 20
Vendeur
INDOO
(Avenel, NJ, Etats-Unis)
Evaluation vendeur
[?]

Description du livre Simon and Schuster. État : New. Brand New. N° de réf. du libraire 068480140X

Plus d'informations sur ce vendeur | Poser une question au libraire

Acheter neuf
EUR 10,10
Autre devise

Ajouter au panier

Frais de port : EUR 16,65
De Etats-Unis vers France
Destinations, frais et délais

9.

Collier, Peter
Edité par Simon & Schuster (1995)
ISBN 10 : 068480140X ISBN 13 : 9780684801407
Neuf(s) Paperback Quantité : 1
Vendeur
Ergodebooks
(RICHMOND, TX, Etats-Unis)
Evaluation vendeur
[?]

Description du livre Simon & Schuster, 1995. Paperback. État : New. N° de réf. du libraire BKTY9780684801407

Plus d'informations sur ce vendeur | Poser une question au libraire

Acheter neuf
EUR 14,68
Autre devise

Ajouter au panier

Frais de port : EUR 12,95
De Etats-Unis vers France
Destinations, frais et délais

10.

Collier, Peter/ Horowitz, David
Edité par Touchstone Books (1995)
ISBN 10 : 068480140X ISBN 13 : 9780684801407
Neuf(s) Paperback Quantité : 2
Vendeur
Revaluation Books
(Exeter, Royaume-Uni)
Evaluation vendeur
[?]

Description du livre Touchstone Books, 1995. Paperback. État : Brand New. reprint edition. 544 pages. 9.00x5.75x1.50 inches. In Stock. N° de réf. du libraire z-068480140X

Plus d'informations sur ce vendeur | Poser une question au libraire

Acheter neuf
EUR 22,61
Autre devise

Ajouter au panier

Frais de port : EUR 6,93
De Royaume-Uni vers France
Destinations, frais et délais

autres exemplaires de ce livre sont disponibles

Afficher tous les résultats pour ce livre