Blue-Eyed Child of Fortune: The Civil War Letters of Colonel Robert Gould Shaw

Note moyenne 4,18
( 133 avis fournis par Goodreads )
 
9780820321745: Blue-Eyed Child of Fortune: The Civil War Letters of Colonel Robert Gould Shaw

On the Boston Common stands one of the great Civil War memorials, a magnificent bronze sculpture by Augustus Saint-Gaudens. It depicts the black soldiers of the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Infantry marching alongside their young white commander, Colonel Robert Gould Shaw. When the philosopher William James dedicated the memorial in May 1897, he stirred the assembled crowd with these words: "There they march, warm-blooded champions of a better day for man. There on horseback among them, in the very habit as he lived, sits the blue-eyed child of fortune."

In this book Shaw speaks for himself with equal eloquence through nearly two hundred letters he wrote to his family and friends during the Civil War. The portrait that emerges is of a man more divided and complex―though no less heroic―than the Shaw depicted in the celebrated film Glory. The pampered son of wealthy Boston abolitionists, Shaw was no abolitionist himself, but he was among the first patriots to respond to Lincoln's call for troops after the attack on Fort Sumter. After Cedar Mountain and Antietam, Shaw knew the carnage of war firsthand. Describing nightfall on the Antietam battlefield, he wrote, "the crickets chirped, and the frogs croaked, just as if nothing unusual had happened all day long, and presently the stars came out bright, and we lay down among the dead, and slept soundly until daylight. There were twenty dead bodies within a rod of me."

When Federal war aims shifted from an emphasis on restoring the Union to the higher goal of emancipation for four million slaves, Shaw's mother pressured her son into accepting the command of the North's vanguard black regiment, the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts. A paternalist who never fully reconciled his own prejudices about black inferiority, Shaw assumed the command with great reluctance. Yet, as he trained his recruits in Readville, Massachusetts, during the early months of 1963, he came to respect their pluck and dedication. "There is not the least doubt," he wrote his mother, "that we shall leave the state, with as good a regiment, as any that has marched."

Despite such expressions of confidence, Shaw in fact continued to worry about how well his troops would perform under fire. The ultimate test came in South Carolina in July 1863, when the Fifty-fourth led a brave but ill-fated charge on Fort Wagner, at the approach to Charleston Harbor. As Shaw waved his sword and urged his men forward, an enemy bullet felled him on the fort's parapet. A few hours later the Confederates dumped his body into a mass grave with the bodies of twenty of his men. Although the assault was a failure from a military standpoint, it proved the proposition to which Shaw had reluctantly dedicated himself when he took command of the Fifty-fourth: that black soldiers could indeed be fighting men. By year's end, sixty new black regiments were being organized.

A previous selection of Shaw's correspondence was privately published by his family in 1864. For this volume, Russell Duncan has restored many passages omitted from the earlier edition and has provided detailed explanatory notes to the letters. In addition he has written a lengthy biographical essay that places the young colonel and his regiment in historical context.

Les informations fournies dans la section « Synopsis » peuvent faire référence à une autre édition de ce titre.

About the Author :

Russell Duncan is a professor of history in the English Institute at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. He is the author of several books, including "First Person Past: American Autobiographies," "Freedom s Shore: Tunis Campbell and the Georgia Freedmen" (Georgia), and "Entrepreneur for Equality: Governor Rufus Bullock, Commerce, and Race in Post-Civil War Georgia" (Georgia)."

Review :

Splendid . . . Important . . . Superb . . . Deserves a place on every Civil War bookshelf . . . Shaw emerges more vividly in this book than he did in the film Glory.

(New York Times Book Review)

A fine and conscientious work.

(Boston Globe)

An affecting collection.

(Washington Times)

Glory resurrected Robert Gould Shaw as a dramatic figure. This book highlights Shaw as the man he really was. The written word far surpasses the screen image in quality.

(Richmond Times-Dispatch)

In Russell Duncan's new edition of the colonel's letters, we meet Robert Gould Shaw at last as a person, not as a symbol. . . . Readers of Shaw's letters will find a young man, not always deep or profound, but with a quality of character forged in conflict. . . . Of course, most readers will want to turn to the letters recounting his experiences as commander of the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts, and they will not be disappointed in the story of how colonel and soldiers taught one another how to be men as well as soldiers. . . . There is something heroic in struggling against one's limitations to achieve greatness. Editor Duncan should be congratulated for reminding us of this truth through bringing us closer to Shaw.

(Journal of American History)

In the film Glory, Robert Gould Shaw was portrayed as a rather stuffy but dedicated and idealistic young officer who led his regiment of African-American soldiers to a magnificent death in an attempt to take the Confederate Fort Wagner off the coast of South Carolina. The real Shaw, as evidenced by this collection of letters written to his parents, siblings, friends, and fiancee, was a much more interesting personality. . . . His letters are a revealing and often moving account of a young man's growth in a time of war.

(Magill Book Reviews)

Russell Duncan's outstanding edition of Shaw's letters is a model for this sort of work. . . . Sustained excellence.

(Civil War Book Review)

Duncan shows the human side of war as it is rarely seen. . . . an engaging portrait.

(Orlando Sentinel)

Les informations fournies dans la section « A propos du livre » peuvent faire référence à une autre édition de ce titre.

Meilleurs résultats de recherche sur AbeBooks

1.

Shaw, Robert Gould
Edité par University of Georgia Press (1999)
ISBN 10 : 0820321745 ISBN 13 : 9780820321745
Neuf(s) Paperback Quantité : 1
Vendeur
pickabook
(san francisco, CA, Etats-Unis)
Evaluation vendeur
[?]

Description du livre University of Georgia Press, 1999. Paperback. État : New. N° de réf. du libraire mon0000141396

Plus d'informations sur ce vendeur | Poser une question au libraire

Acheter neuf
EUR 19,94
Autre devise

Ajouter au panier

Frais de port : EUR 3,43
Vers Etats-Unis
Destinations, frais et délais

2.

Shaw, Robert Gould
ISBN 10 : 0820321745 ISBN 13 : 9780820321745
Neuf(s) Quantité : 12
Vendeur
Paperbackshop-US
(Wood Dale, IL, Etats-Unis)
Evaluation vendeur
[?]

Description du livre 1999. PAP. État : New. New Book. Shipped from US within 10 to 14 business days. Established seller since 2000. N° de réf. du libraire KB-9780820321745

Plus d'informations sur ce vendeur | Poser une question au libraire

Acheter neuf
EUR 22,86
Autre devise

Ajouter au panier

Frais de port : EUR 3,43
Vers Etats-Unis
Destinations, frais et délais

3.

Robert Gould Shaw
Edité par University of Georgia
ISBN 10 : 0820321745 ISBN 13 : 9780820321745
Neuf(s) Couverture souple Quantité : 1
Vendeur
C. Clayton Thompson - Bookseller
(BOONE, NC, Etats-Unis)
Evaluation vendeur
[?]

Description du livre University of Georgia. État : BRAND NEW. BRAND NEW Softcover A Brand New Quality Book from a Full-Time Bookshop in business since 1992!. N° de réf. du libraire 2383603

Plus d'informations sur ce vendeur | Poser une question au libraire

Acheter neuf
EUR 28,25
Autre devise

Ajouter au panier

Frais de port : Gratuit
Vers Etats-Unis
Destinations, frais et délais

4.

Robert Shaw
Edité par Syracus University Press
ISBN 10 : 0820321745 ISBN 13 : 9780820321745
Neuf(s) Quantité : > 20
Vendeur
INDOO
(Avenel, NJ, Etats-Unis)
Evaluation vendeur
[?]

Description du livre Syracus University Press. État : New. Brand New. N° de réf. du libraire 0820321745

Plus d'informations sur ce vendeur | Poser une question au libraire

Acheter neuf
EUR 25,27
Autre devise

Ajouter au panier

Frais de port : EUR 3,01
Vers Etats-Unis
Destinations, frais et délais

5.

Shaw, Robert
Edité par University of Georgia Press
ISBN 10 : 0820321745 ISBN 13 : 9780820321745
Neuf(s) Quantité : 1
Vendeur
Ohmsoft LLC
(Lake Forest, IL, Etats-Unis)
Evaluation vendeur
[?]

Description du livre University of Georgia Press. État : Brand New. Ships from USA. FREE domestic shipping. N° de réf. du libraire 0820321745

Plus d'informations sur ce vendeur | Poser une question au libraire

Acheter neuf
EUR 28,32
Autre devise

Ajouter au panier

Frais de port : Gratuit
Vers Etats-Unis
Destinations, frais et délais

6.

Robert Shaw
Edité par University of Georgia Press (1999)
ISBN 10 : 0820321745 ISBN 13 : 9780820321745
Neuf(s) Paperback Quantité : 1
Vendeur
Irish Booksellers
(Rumford, ME, Etats-Unis)
Evaluation vendeur
[?]

Description du livre University of Georgia Press, 1999. Paperback. État : New. book. N° de réf. du libraire 0820321745

Plus d'informations sur ce vendeur | Poser une question au libraire

Acheter neuf
EUR 30,69
Autre devise

Ajouter au panier

Frais de port : Gratuit
Vers Etats-Unis
Destinations, frais et délais

7.

Robert Gould Shaw
Edité par University of Georgia Press, United States (1999)
ISBN 10 : 0820321745 ISBN 13 : 9780820321745
Neuf(s) Paperback Quantité : 10
Vendeur
The Book Depository US
(London, Royaume-Uni)
Evaluation vendeur
[?]

Description du livre University of Georgia Press, United States, 1999. Paperback. État : New. New edition. Language: English . Brand New Book. On the Boston Common stands one of the great Civil War memorials, a magnificent bronze sculpture by Augustus Saint-Gaudens. It depicts the black soldiers of the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Infantry marching alongside their young white commander, Colonel Robert Gould Shaw. When the philosopher William James dedicated the memorial in May 1897, he stirred the assembled crowd with these words: There they march, warm-blooded champions of a better day for man. There on horseback among them, in the very habit as he lived, sits the blue-eyed child of fortune. In this book Shaw speaks for himself with equal eloquence through nearly two hundred letters he wrote to his family and friends during the Civil War. The portrait that emerges is of a man more divided and complex--though no less heroic--than the Shaw depicted in the celebrated film Glory. The pampered son of wealthy Boston abolitionists, Shaw was no abolitionist himself, but he was among the first patriots to respond to Lincoln s call for troops after the attack on Fort Sumter. After Cedar Mountain and Antietam, Shaw knew the carnage of war firsthand. Describing nightfall on the Antietam battlefield, he wrote, the crickets chirped, and the frogs croaked, just as if nothing unusual had happened all day long, and presently the stars came out bright, and we lay down among the dead, and slept soundly until daylight. There were twenty dead bodies within a rod of me. When Federal war aims shifted from an emphasis on restoring the Union to the higher goal of emancipation for four million slaves, Shaw s mother pressured her son into accepting the command of the North s vanguard black regiment, the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts. A paternalist who never fully reconciled his own prejudices about black inferiority, Shaw assumed the command with great reluctance. Yet, as he trained his recruits in Readville, Massachusetts, during the early months of 1963, he came to respect their pluck and dedication. There is not the least doubt, he wrote his mother, that we shall leave the state, with as good a regiment, as any that has marched. Despite such expressions of confidence, Shaw in fact continued to worry about how well his troops would perform under fire. The ultimate test came in South Carolina in July 1863, when the Fifty-fourth led a brave but ill-fated charge on Fort Wagner, at the approach to Charleston Harbor. As Shaw waved his sword and urged his men forward, an enemy bullet felled him on the fort s parapet. A few hours later the Confederates dumped his body into a mass grave with the bodies of twenty of his men. Although the assault was a failure from a military standpoint, it proved the proposition to which Shaw had reluctantly dedicated himself when he took command of the Fifty-fourth: that black soldiers could indeed be fighting men. By year s end, sixty new black regiments were being organized.A previous selection of Shaw s correspondence was privately published by his family in 1864. For this volume, Russell Duncan has restored many passages omitted from the earlier edition and has provided detailed explanatory notes to the letters. In addition he has written a lengthy biographical essay that places the young colonel and his regiment in historical context. N° de réf. du libraire AAS9780820321745

Plus d'informations sur ce vendeur | Poser une question au libraire

Acheter neuf
EUR 31,31
Autre devise

Ajouter au panier

Frais de port : Gratuit
De Royaume-Uni vers Etats-Unis
Destinations, frais et délais

8.

Robert Gould Shaw
Edité par University of Georgia Press, United States (1999)
ISBN 10 : 0820321745 ISBN 13 : 9780820321745
Neuf(s) Paperback Quantité : 10
Vendeur
The Book Depository
(London, Royaume-Uni)
Evaluation vendeur
[?]

Description du livre University of Georgia Press, United States, 1999. Paperback. État : New. New edition. Language: English . Brand New Book. On the Boston Common stands one of the great Civil War memorials, a magnificent bronze sculpture by Augustus Saint-Gaudens. It depicts the black soldiers of the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Infantry marching alongside their young white commander, Colonel Robert Gould Shaw. When the philosopher William James dedicated the memorial in May 1897, he stirred the assembled crowd with these words: There they march, warm-blooded champions of a better day for man. There on horseback among them, in the very habit as he lived, sits the blue-eyed child of fortune. In this book Shaw speaks for himself with equal eloquence through nearly two hundred letters he wrote to his family and friends during the Civil War. The portrait that emerges is of a man more divided and complex--though no less heroic--than the Shaw depicted in the celebrated film Glory. The pampered son of wealthy Boston abolitionists, Shaw was no abolitionist himself, but he was among the first patriots to respond to Lincoln s call for troops after the attack on Fort Sumter. After Cedar Mountain and Antietam, Shaw knew the carnage of war firsthand. Describing nightfall on the Antietam battlefield, he wrote, the crickets chirped, and the frogs croaked, just as if nothing unusual had happened all day long, and presently the stars came out bright, and we lay down among the dead, and slept soundly until daylight. There were twenty dead bodies within a rod of me. When Federal war aims shifted from an emphasis on restoring the Union to the higher goal of emancipation for four million slaves, Shaw s mother pressured her son into accepting the command of the North s vanguard black regiment, the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts. A paternalist who never fully reconciled his own prejudices about black inferiority, Shaw assumed the command with great reluctance. Yet, as he trained his recruits in Readville, Massachusetts, during the early months of 1963, he came to respect their pluck and dedication. There is not the least doubt, he wrote his mother, that we shall leave the state, with as good a regiment, as any that has marched. Despite such expressions of confidence, Shaw in fact continued to worry about how well his troops would perform under fire. The ultimate test came in South Carolina in July 1863, when the Fifty-fourth led a brave but ill-fated charge on Fort Wagner, at the approach to Charleston Harbor. As Shaw waved his sword and urged his men forward, an enemy bullet felled him on the fort s parapet. A few hours later the Confederates dumped his body into a mass grave with the bodies of twenty of his men. Although the assault was a failure from a military standpoint, it proved the proposition to which Shaw had reluctantly dedicated himself when he took command of the Fifty-fourth: that black soldiers could indeed be fighting men. By year s end, sixty new black regiments were being organized.A previous selection of Shaw s correspondence was privately published by his family in 1864. For this volume, Russell Duncan has restored many passages omitted from the earlier edition and has provided detailed explanatory notes to the letters. In addition he has written a lengthy biographical essay that places the young colonel and his regiment in historical context. N° de réf. du libraire AAS9780820321745

Plus d'informations sur ce vendeur | Poser une question au libraire

Acheter neuf
EUR 31,33
Autre devise

Ajouter au panier

Frais de port : Gratuit
De Royaume-Uni vers Etats-Unis
Destinations, frais et délais

9.

Cvc, Robert Gould Shaw
Edité par University of Georgia Press, United States (1999)
ISBN 10 : 0820321745 ISBN 13 : 9780820321745
Neuf(s) Paperback Quantité : 10
Vendeur
Book Depository hard to find
(London, Royaume-Uni)
Evaluation vendeur
[?]

Description du livre University of Georgia Press, United States, 1999. Paperback. État : New. New edition. Language: English . This book usually ship within 10-15 business days and we will endeavor to dispatch orders quicker than this where possible. Brand New Book. On the Boston Common stands one of the great Civil War memorials, a magnificent bronze sculpture by Augustus Saint-Gaudens. It depicts the black soldiers of the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Infantry marching alongside their young white commander, Colonel Robert Gould Shaw. When the philosopher William James dedicated the memorial in May 1897, he stirred the assembled crowd with these words: There they march, warm-blooded champions of a better day for man. There on horseback among them, in the very habit as he lived, sits the blue-eyed child of fortune. In this book Shaw speaks for himself with equal eloquence through nearly two hundred letters he wrote to his family and friends during the Civil War. The portrait that emerges is of a man more divided and complex--though no less heroic--than the Shaw depicted in the celebrated film Glory. The pampered son of wealthy Boston abolitionists, Shaw was no abolitionist himself, but he was among the first patriots to respond to Lincoln s call for troops after the attack on Fort Sumter. After Cedar Mountain and Antietam, Shaw knew the carnage of war firsthand. Describing nightfall on the Antietam battlefield, he wrote, the crickets chirped, and the frogs croaked, just as if nothing unusual had happened all day long, and presently the stars came out bright, and we lay down among the dead, and slept soundly until daylight. There were twenty dead bodies within a rod of me. When Federal war aims shifted from an emphasis on restoring the Union to the higher goal of emancipation for four million slaves, Shaw s mother pressured her son into accepting the command of the North s vanguard black regiment, the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts. A paternalist who never fully reconciled his own prejudices about black inferiority, Shaw assumed the command with great reluctance. Yet, as he trained his recruits in Readville, Massachusetts, during the early months of 1963, he came to respect their pluck and dedication. There is not the least doubt, he wrote his mother, that we shall leave the state, with as good a regiment, as any that has marched. Despite such expressions of confidence, Shaw in fact continued to worry about how well his troops would perform under fire. The ultimate test came in South Carolina in July 1863, when the Fifty-fourth led a brave but ill-fated charge on Fort Wagner, at the approach to Charleston Harbor. As Shaw waved his sword and urged his men forward, an enemy bullet felled him on the fort s parapet. A few hours later the Confederates dumped his body into a mass grave with the bodies of twenty of his men. Although the assault was a failure from a military standpoint, it proved the proposition to which Shaw had reluctantly dedicated himself when he took command of the Fifty-fourth: that black soldiers could indeed be fighting men. By year s end, sixty new black regiments were being organized.A previous selection of Shaw s correspondence was privately published by his family in 1864. For this volume, Russell Duncan has restored many passages omitted from the earlier edition and has provided detailed explanatory notes to the letters. In addition he has written a lengthy biographical essay that places the young colonel and his regiment in historical context. N° de réf. du libraire TNP9780820321745

Plus d'informations sur ce vendeur | Poser une question au libraire

Acheter neuf
EUR 34,04
Autre devise

Ajouter au panier

Frais de port : Gratuit
De Royaume-Uni vers Etats-Unis
Destinations, frais et délais

10.

CVC (author), Robert Gould Shaw (author), Russell Duncan (volume editor), William S. McFeeley (foreword)
Edité par The University of Georgia Press 1999-11-30, Athens (1999)
ISBN 10 : 0820321745 ISBN 13 : 9780820321745
Neuf(s) paperback Quantité : > 20
Vendeur
Blackwell's
(Oxford, OX, Royaume-Uni)
Evaluation vendeur
[?]

Description du livre The University of Georgia Press 1999-11-30, Athens, 1999. paperback. État : New. N° de réf. du libraire 9780820321745

Plus d'informations sur ce vendeur | Poser une question au libraire

Acheter neuf
EUR 32,25
Autre devise

Ajouter au panier

Frais de port : EUR 3,36
De Royaume-Uni vers Etats-Unis
Destinations, frais et délais

autres exemplaires de ce livre sont disponibles

Afficher tous les résultats pour ce livre