Historical Southern Bread Recipes: 300 Years of Delicious Baked Dough

 
9781475242119: Historical Southern Bread Recipes: 300 Years of Delicious Baked Dough

When I was a little boy my mama would send me off to Grandma Marshall and Grandpa Jim to spend summers in Arkansas. It was a great place for a young boy from Southern California to spend 3 months – in the South. I remember thunderstorms on a hot summer’s afternoon, beating down on the old, tin roof and cooling things off just a bit until the sun came back out. Boy, then it got muggy! I ran around the yard at dusk catching fireflies in an old Mason jar Grandma Marshall gave me, and it’d light up the table by my bed until I was fast asleep. I recollect laying near the pile of potatoes in the cool, old root cellar out back when it was too hot to play outside. I think of all those fruits and pits I scraped off my shoes from that gigantic tree that dropped apricots so thick we couldn’t help but mush ‘em under our feet. But the thing I remember most about staying with Grandma and Grandpa was the sweet odor of burning hickory in the old wood stove before the sun ever popped over the hills or a rooster even made a peep. And biscuits cooking. Mmmmm, biscuits. I couldn’t stay asleep from the smell of those biscuits baking in that oven if I tried. I’d get up and run into the kitchen where Grandma Marshall was standing under that lone, light-bulb hanging down from the ceiling on a wire. Jumping up in a chair, I’d watch her roll those biscuits on that floured breadboard and cut them out with an old drinking glass; I grew up to learn later that was the jar that Grandpa’s snuff came in. But she had a whole matching set. Grandma loved to make breads. Corn pone, Johnny cakes, hush puppies, monkey bread, hardtack, fry bread, soda bread and (yum) shortening bread. And every one of them came with a story about where she got the recipe or how that bread came to be. She’d tell me about war bread and depression cakes. How hardtack got its name and about her mama baking Civil War tooth dullers. And she’d sing me an old folk song: “Mammy’s little baby love short’nin’, short’nin’, Mammy’s little baby love short’nin’ bread. Put on de skillet, put on de led, Mammy’s gonna make a little short’nin’ bread.” - E. C. Perrow, 1915 So that’s what Southern Historical Bread Recipes – 300 Years of Delicious Bread Making is about. Making breads and pastries, the recipes and some of the stories that go along with it. Bread making is meant to be fun and a time for everyone to gather around the old kitchen table and laugh, sing and tell stories while Mama rolls out the dough. We lose some of our stories and songs over time, so this is a chance to keep some of our centuries old traditions, stories and recipes alive. So come on in. Sing, laugh, tell stories and taste some good, old-fashioned, Southern breads of all kinds.

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Gatlin T Quinn
Edité par CreateSpace (2012)
ISBN 10 : 1475242115 ISBN 13 : 9781475242119
Neuf(s) Paperback Quantité : 1
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Revaluation Books
(Exeter, Royaume-Uni)
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Description du livre CreateSpace, 2012. Paperback. État : Brand New. 94 pages. 9.00x6.00x0.23 inches. This item is printed on demand. N° de réf. du libraire zk1475242115

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Acheter neuf
EUR 23,57
Autre devise

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Frais de port : EUR 6,69
De Royaume-Uni vers Etats-Unis
Destinations, frais et délais