Noor Inayat Khan Twenty Jataka Tales

ISBN 13 : 9788177691122

Twenty Jataka Tales

Note moyenne 4,2
( 99 avis fournis par Goodreads )
 
9788177691122: Twenty Jataka Tales

These delightful fables tell of acts of sacrifice inspired by the noble example of others. The flavor is suggestive of Aesop, as are the lessons that are so subtly and keenly conveyed.

Les informations fournies dans la section « Synopsis » peuvent faire référence à une autre édition de ce titre.

From the Back Cover :

LITERATURE

"Noor Inayat Khan remains, in the minds and hearts of many, an exemplary figure whose life has been their inspiration."
Pir Vilayat Inayat Khan, Head of Sufi Order founded in 1910 by Hazrat Inayat Khan

These twenty tales have been drawn from famous legends concerning the former lives of the Buddha. Beloved by children and adults alike, they tell of people and animals moved to acts of sacrifice by the noble example of their fellow creatures. The flavor is often suggestive of Aesop, as are the lessons that are so subtly and keenly conveyed. Presented in a simplified narrative, the tales maintain the magical and timeless beauty of their Far Eastern origins. The stories are ideal for reading to children, as they tell of highly dramatic adventures that are resolved by non-violent and compassionate means. Challenging circumstances bring forth courage and the capacity to love, opening the way to solutions against seemingly impossible odds. This book will also be coveted for its exquisite illustrations by the well-known illustrator H. Willebeek Le Mair.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved. :

That Odd Mary Magdalene

It seems that even among Jesus’ disciples, Mary played a privileged role. Why, then, did the Roman Catholic Church feel obliged to almost entirely erase this female figure and her role? Was it because of a now proven anti-feminism that existed at the heart of the Church from the early Middle Ages? The Christian conception of femininity, which has certainly greatly evolved in the modern world, especially since the council of Vatican II, is due both to Greco-Roman legacy and to the Hebraic options. With the exception of the female characters of Genesis, who are gripping figures to say the least, the scribes of the Bible lowered the status of Woman by making her impure and thus not apt, for example, to play a sacerdotal role. The idea that Mary Magdalene enjoyed total equality with the apostles has never crossed the minds of Church theologians. Because priests are the legitimate heirs of the apostles, such a standing would make Mary Magdalene, on the one hand, a priestess--how horrible!--and on the other, one of those on whom the apostolic sacerdotal filiation was founded.

Yet, when Mary of Bethany washes Jesus’ feet and anoints him with precious perfume, which Judas, the group’s treasurer, believes could be put to a more profitable use, she and Jesus are enacting a kind of sacerdotal and royal ordination--with Mary serving as the priestess who performs the ritual.

Is it forbidden to think that Mary of Bethany, over the course of those long moments spent at the feet of the Lord, could have heard what he had to say or at least sensed the full scope of Christ’s mystery even if she did not grasp it in its entirety? Jesus persistently tried to lead his disciples to realize this--if only in the 飬at of the Transfiguration!--but their hearts remained curiously closed all the way to the end. Mary, however, did perceive and accept it. On that day she knew the moment had come to manifest this mystery in chiaroscuro. In a kind of prophetic intuition . . . Mary anointed the head of Jesus, recognizing and presenting him as King and Priest, and anointed his feet as Messiah sent from God.

Such a presentation obviously involves a rite of enthronement that can be performed only by a person vested symbolically with sacerdotal powers. Jesus was fully aware of this when he answered Martha’s reproaches by saying that Mary “had the best part.”

At that time there were two sites named Bethany: a town two miles east of Jerusalem, where Mary, Martha, and Lazarus lived; and on the left bank of the Jordan, at a ford just before the Dead Sea, where John the Baptist baptized. In addition, there was a place called Bethabara, “house of passage,” by the gates to the desert. John the Baptist and later Mary, each in their own way, granted baptism, initiation, the right of passage, or the means of crossing the threshold. The two Bethanys, then, seem to mirror each other. Magdalene extends the echo of her precursor, John the Baptist. One is a man clad in hides and the other is a woman clad in her long mane of hair. The chief difference between them is that John remains in a harsh and terrible place, screaming in Essenian rigor his curses and his calls to repent, whereas Mary in Bethany, on the opposite where all is blooming and gay, speaks of love and forgiveness and the transition from one world to the next. While Jesus received from John a baptism in water, he did not receive, as the ancient kings had, a consecrating anointing with oil. Just before his Passion and “baptism by spirit and fire”--the crucifixion--he received the perfumed oil from the female Magdalene. The old and ancient notion of the priest-king applies to Jesus, but this royal unction, let me repeat, can only be performed by a priest--or priestess.

The unction in Bethany is surely one of the most important events in the life of Jesus. Furthermore, this is what Jesus himself says to his disciples who are always more or less hostile toward the whims of Woman: He declares to them that this woman truly did “what she had to do,” and even adds, according to Mark 14:9, “In truth, I declare to you, everywhere the Gospel is to be spread, throughout the whole world, one will also recount, in memory of her, the deed she has done.” This is acknowledgment of an uncommon power possessed by Mary that went far beyond a mere gesture of female vanity, which is clearly what the first disciples thought it to be, and underscores the importance Magdalene was given in the very words of Jesus.

Why, then, was Mary Magdalene relegated to such a minor role in the evangelical tradition as revised and corrected by the Church Fathers? Is the Christian sacerdotal class ashamed to owe so much to a woman?

And I cannot forbear from asking myself: what has the memory of the Church done to these words of Jesus? Isn’t there something yet to be explored there? And wouldn’t this something be the consecration of a specifically female ministry of a prophetic and charismatic nature that Jesus would himself have recognized and proclaimed as existing in tandem with the apostolic and sacerdotal ministry? What a unique place woman would hold in the very heart of the Church if this was the case!

The question certainly has been raised--and it seems that Abbe Sauni貥 may have answered it in his own way in the church of Rennes-le-Chateau.

Les informations fournies dans la section « A propos du livre » peuvent faire référence à une autre édition de ce titre.

Meilleurs résultats de recherche sur AbeBooks

1.

Noor Inayat Khan
ISBN 10 : 8177691120 ISBN 13 : 9788177691122
Ancien(s) ou d'occasion Quantité : 1
Vendeur
Big Hearted Books
(Sharon, MA, Etats-Unis)
Evaluation vendeur
[?]

Description du livre État : Good. This item is in good condition. All pages and covers are readable. There are no stains or tears. Dust jacket is present if applicable. May contain small amounts of writing and/or highlighting. Spine and cover may show signs of wear. May not contain supplementary items such as CD's or DVD's. We ship within 1 business day. N° de réf. du libraire 34FA2M0010S8_ns

Plus d'informations sur ce vendeur | Poser une question au libraire

Acheter D'occasion
EUR 6,13
Autre devise

Ajouter au panier

Frais de port : Gratuit
Vers Etats-Unis
Destinations, frais et délais

2.

Khan, Noor Inayat
ISBN 10 : 8177691120 ISBN 13 : 9788177691122
Ancien(s) ou d'occasion Paperback Quantité : 1
Vendeur
WorldofBooks
(Goring-By-Sea, WS, Royaume-Uni)
Evaluation vendeur
[?]

Description du livre Paperback. État : Good. The book has been read but remains in clean condition. All pages are intact and the cover is intact. Some minor wear to the spine. N° de réf. du libraire GOR005299025

Plus d'informations sur ce vendeur | Poser une question au libraire

Acheter D'occasion
EUR 8,50
Autre devise

Ajouter au panier

Frais de port : EUR 5,44
De Royaume-Uni vers Etats-Unis
Destinations, frais et délais

3.

Noor Inayat Khan
Edité par Pilgrims Publishing (2005)
ISBN 10 : 8177691120 ISBN 13 : 9788177691122
Ancien(s) ou d'occasion Paperback Quantité : 1
Vendeur
Murray Media
(North Miami Beach, FL, Etats-Unis)
Evaluation vendeur
[?]

Description du livre Pilgrims Publishing, 2005. Paperback. État : Very Good. N° de réf. du libraire P028177691120

Plus d'informations sur ce vendeur | Poser une question au libraire

Acheter D'occasion
EUR 66,31
Autre devise

Ajouter au panier

Frais de port : EUR 2,56
Vers Etats-Unis
Destinations, frais et délais