CONVERSATIONS ON THE PLURALITY OF WORLDS . A New Translation from the Last Edition of the French, with Great Additions, Extracted from the Best Modern Authors, on Many Curious and Entertaining Subjects . The Second Edition. By a Gentleman of the

Fontenelle, Bernard le Bovier, Sieur de.

Edité par Printed for Thomas Caslon, at No. 4, opposite Stationers-Hall, Ludgate-street
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Titre : CONVERSATIONS ON THE PLURALITY OF WORLDS . A...
Éditeur : Printed for Thomas Caslon, at No. 4, opposite Stationers-Hall, Ludgate-street
Etat du livre : Good

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Fontenelle, Bernard le Bovier, Sieur de
Edité par Printed for Thomas Caslon, at No. 4, opposite Stationers-Hall, Ludgate-street, London (1767)
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Description du livre Printed for Thomas Caslon, at No. 4, opposite Stationers-Hall, Ludgate-street, London, 1767. Octavo, pp. [i-iii] iv-xvii [xviii-xix] xx-xxvii [xxviii-xxix] xxx-xlvi [xlvii, mispaged "xlvi"] [xlviii] xlix-li [lii-liii] liv-lxiv] [1] 2-401 [402: ad], four inserted folding plates, early brown leather, spine panel tooled in gold and blind, black leather title label affixed to spine panel. The "second" edition of this anonymous translation, first published in 1760. Fontenelle's ENTRETIENS SUR LA PLURALITE DES MONDES, his most famous and frequently reprinted and translated book, was first published in 1686. It is "the first example in French of a learned work placed within the reach of an educated but non specialized public." - DSB, V, 59. A popular account of the systems of Ptolemy, Copernicus, and Tycho Brahe in dialogue form, the treatise "awakened general interest in astronomy and popularized the scientific system of inquiry; it also emphasized the small space occupied by man and this planet relatively to the rest of the universe. The work was ridiculed by Voltaire, though it suggested his MICROMEGAS." - The Oxford Companion to French Literature (1959), p. 278. The first of the three seventeenth-century English translations was A DISCOURSE OF THE PLURALITY OF WORLDS . Translated into English by Sir W. D. Knight. (Dublin: Printed by Andr. Crook and Sam. Helsham, for William Norman, 1687). The first edition of the Glanvill translation (containing five dialogues) was published in 1688, the same year Aphra Behn's translation of Fontenelle's book, A DISCOVERY OF NEW WORLDS, was published in London by William Canning. The later Gardiner translation was first published in London by Bettesworth and E. Curll in 1715. This anonymous translation by a "Gentleman of the Inner-Temple" was first published in London by R. Withy in 1760. The 1760 and 1767 editions add considerable supplemental material by various writers to each of Fontenelle's six dialogues. "In all the literature of the cosmic voyage there was no book more popular than Fontenelle's CONVERSATIONS OF THE PLURALITY OF WORLDS. Translated again and again, it seemed to the British peculiarly their own book, read for at least a century both by men and by those 'ladies' of whom we have many a description, one of whom would read it aloud to others who were busily engaged in making strawberry jam. This was a book, indeed, that warranted a subtitle I once discovered in an eighteenth-century popularization of astronomy: 'Science made clear to the Meanest Capacities, even those of Women and Children.'" - Nicolson, Voyages to the Moon, pp. 58-9. Fontenelle's book "became a seminal influence on proto science fiction . This is one of the earliest works ever written popularizing science, notably astronomy, for the layman, which it does by wittily presenting its speculations -- many about the possibility of life on other worlds -- in the form of conversations after dinner between the author and a marquise." - Clute and Nicholls (eds), The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction (1993), p. 437. See Ley, Rockets, Missiles, and Space Travel (1951), pp. 22-4 and Ley, Rockets, Missiles, and Men in Space (1968), pp. 21-2 for a good summary of the book. Bleiler, Science-Fiction: The Early Years, p. 853. See Negley, Utopian Literature: A Bibliography 368-372 (this translation not recorded). Versins, Encyclopédie de l'Utopie, des Voyages Extraordinaires, et de la Science Fiction, pp. 341-42. CBEL II, 1513. Binding worn along edges of front and rear covers, largely at corners, recently rebacked, a clean, tight, very good copy. An early, important and scarce edition of this classic work. (#147704). N° de réf. du libraire 147704

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