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COLERIDGE, Samuel Taylor.

Edité par Bristol: and sold by the booksellers and newscarriers in town and country (1796)

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About this Item: Bristol: and sold by the booksellers and newscarriers in town and country, 1796. A complete set of the ten numbers, each of 32pp but continuously paginated: 8vo, pp. 192, [197]-324; the first number in the second issue (see below); some light dust-soiling; small flaw on p. 143 affecting a few words of text; else an excellent copy, in modern dark red straight-grained morocco, top edge gilt, spine lettered in gilt. First edition. Coleridge began his plans for this important series of papers by touring the industrial cities of Birmingham, Sheffield and Manchester in January 1796, raising subscriptions for a journal that would be issued every eight days (thus evading the duty on weekly newspapers). The motto at the head of each number may have seemed dangerously radical, but its biblical origin from John's Gospel made it unimpeachable: 'That all may know the truth; and that the truth may make us free!'. The contents were a mixture of news, essays, reviews, parliamentary reports and poetry: much of it was written by Coleridge himself, but the lack of enthusiasm from his readers resulted in the series coming to an abrupt end with the tenth number. This set has the first number in its second issue, with a short s in 'Published' on the first page, and the second line on p. 2 ending 'prevention; and the triple-giant'. Tinker 677; Crane & Kaye 916; Ashley I p. 196. N° de réf. du vendeur 22088

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SOUTHEY, Robert.

Edité par London -29 (1815)

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About this Item: London -29, 1815. Together 16 volumes, 12mo, as listed below; uniformly bound in contemporary pink half calf over marbled boards, spines gilt, black morocco labels. A superb collection of volumes, all from the library of the talented Sara Coleridge (1802-52), only daughter of Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Sara Fricker. Many of the books were presented to her by her uncle, Robert Southey, and inscribed as such either by Sara herself, Southey or her husband Henry Nelson Coleridge, whom she married in 1829. Because of her parents' fractured marriage, Sara grew up living at Greta Hall in the Lake District, with Southey and his wife, Edith. 'The ongoing literary labours of Wordsworth and Southey thus ensured an almost constant stream of visitors at Greta Hall, and by the age of twenty Sara had met many of the most famous writers of her day. This stimulating environment, the excellent tutelage of her mother and uncle, her own intellectual prowess, and the impecunious state of the Coleridge family all contributed to Sara's first literary efforts' (ODNB). The collection consists of the following titles: 1. THE MINOR POEMS OF ROBERT SOUTHEY London: printed for Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, Paternoster-Row. 1815. Three volumes, 12mo, pp. [iii]-viii, 248; [iii]-vii, [i], 238; [iii]-vii, [i], 3-242; bound without the half titles; small stain at beginning of vol. II. Inscribed on first title: 'Sara Coleridge / Greta-hall / Keswick'. The inscription is in Sara Coleridge's own hand. 2. THE POET'S PILGRIMAGE TO WATERLOO Second edition. London: printed for Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, Paternoster-Row. 1816. 12mo, pp. [viii], 232; with eight plates bound at the end (somewhat discoloured in places). Inscribed on title: 'Sara Coleridge / from / Robert Southey. 1830'. This is in the hand of her husband, Henry Nelson Coleridge 3. THE CURSE OF KEHAMA The fourth edition. London: printed for Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, Paternoster-Row. 1818. Two volumes, 12mo, pp. xi, [v], 261; [iv], 216. Inscribed on half title to volume I: 'Sara Coleridge / from / Robert Southey. 1830'. This is also in Henry Nelson Coleridge's hand. 4. THALABA THE DESTROYER The fourth edition London: printed for Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, Paternoster-Row. 1821. Two volumes. 12mo, pp. [iii]-ix, [i], 271, [1] colophon; [iv], 294; apparently without the half title in volume I. Inscribed on both titles: 'Sara Coleridge / from Robert Southey. / 1829'. Again, the inscription is by Henry Nelson Coleridge. Also inscribed on endpaper of both volumes: 'Ellen Coleridge / May 1886'. This is presumably Ellen (née Phillips), widow of Herbert Coleridge, philologist, Sara's only son, who had died of consumption in 1861. 5. CARMEN TRIUMPHALE, for the commencement of the year 1814. Carmina Aulica. Written in 1814, on the arrival of the allied sovereigns in England Second edition. London: printed for Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, Paternoster-Row. 1821. 12mo, pp. 93, [1] colophon. Not inscribed. 6. THE EXPEDITION OF ORSUA; and the crimes of Aguirre London: printed for Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, Paternoster-Row. 1821 12mo, pp. [iii]-x, 215; apparently bound without the half title. Not inscribed. 7. MADOC Fifth edition London: printed for Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, Paternoster-Row. 1825. Two volumes, 12mo, pp. ix, [iii], 303, [1] colophon; [iv], 284; a few leaves in sig. C in volume I beginning to spring from the binding. Inscribed on first half title: 'Sara Coleridge / from / Robert Southey. / 1830'. This is in the hand of Henry Nelson Coleridge. 8. A TALE OF PARAGUAY London: printed for Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, Paternoster-Row. 1825. 12mo, pp. xviii, [ii], 199, [1]; with engraved frontispiece and one other plate, both by Heath after Westall. First edition. Inscribed by Southey at head of title: 'Sara Coleridge, from the Author' 9. RODERICK, THE LAST OF THE GOTHS Sixth edition. London: printed for Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, Paternoster-Row. 1826. Two volumes, 12mo, pp. ix, [iii], 297, [1] colophon; [iv], 293, [1] colophon. Not inscribed. 10. ALL FOR LOVE; AND THE PILGRIM TO COMPOSTELLA London: John Murray, Albemarle Street. 1829. 12mo, pp. [vi], 221, [1]; with engraved frontispiece by Finden after Westall. Inscribed at head of title: 'Sara Coleridge / from / the Author. 1831. Hampstea[d]' (last letter cropped). This is in the hand of Henry Nelson Coleridge. N° de réf. du vendeur 22222

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HOOKES, Nicholas.

Edité par London printed by T.R. and E.M. for Humphrey Tuckey at the signe of the black Spread-Eagle near St. Dunstans Church (1653)

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About this Item: London printed by T.R. and E.M. for Humphrey Tuckey at the signe of the black Spread-Eagle near St. Dunstans Church, 1653. 8vo, pp. [xxiv], 191; with an engraved frontispiece (neatly strengthened at margins), and complete with longitudinal half-title as A1; in contemporary calf, ruled in blind (neat restoration to the head and tail of spine); in a cloth folding case. First edition of the author's only book, published when he was just 25. The first portion of this volume (pp. 1-88) consists of a series of amatory poems in the Cavalier manner, addressed to an imaginary mistress, with titles like 'To Amanda on her dimples', 'To Amanda lying in bed', and 'To Amanda supposing and wishing she were with childe'. Interspersed are a handful of unrelated pieces, including 'To Mr. Lilly, Musick-Master in Cambridge', and two poems addressed to Sir Thomas Leverthorpe, Bart., of Shingle-Hall, an undergraduate at Christ's College. The second part, with its own title-page in Latin (Miscellanea Poetica), is a collection of occasional verse, in both English and Latin. Nicholas Hookes (1628-1712) was born in London and educated at Westminster School; he was elected to a scholarship at Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1649, and received his BA degree four years later, at about the time this book was published. 'Some of his humorous pieces are curiously illustrative of manners, and from many passages it can be seen that the author was a close student of Shakespeare, whose phraseology he frequently borrows to the letter' (DNB). Having made this elaborate debut, however, the author vanished from sight; nothing more is known of Hookes until his death in Lambeth almost sixty years later. The emblematic engraved frontispiece shows four cupids supporting an altar, upon which is a burning heart to which another cupid is applying a torch. A very uncommon book: the last complete copies to appear at auction, both rebound or heavily repaired, were those of the Bradley Martin (1990: $8000 hammer) and John Brett-Smith (2004: £1200, but lacking a preliminary leaf and with the frontispiece washed). The present copy is in fine condition, complete with the longitudinal half-title at the front. Such leaves enjoyed a brief vogue in the mid-17th century; they appear to have been intended for use as a kind of shelf label, wrapped around the fore-edges of the volume or pasted on the spine, or possibly, as Michael Sadleir once suggested, folded around unbound sheets in a bookseller's shop, but whatever the intended purpose the experiment did not catch on, and was soon abandoned. Also present are two internal blank leaves, G5, at the end of the title-poem, and H1, after the preliminaries of Part II; the latter is entirely blank except for the single letter H, which in our experience is very unusual. Two states of the last leaf of preliminaries (a4) have been noted. This copy has this leaf in the earlier state, with six lines of errata on the verso, and two commas inadvertently omitted from a line in the poem above ('The Authour to the Ladies'). In virtually all known copies a seventh line of errata has been added, and the punctuation has been corrected. Provenance. A pencilled note on the front flyleaf identifies this copy as from the collection of Roderick Terry; an inserted card also describes it as having once been in the 'private collection' of A.S.W. Rosenbach. More recently in the collection of Robert S Pirie of New York, bought from John Fleming in 1961. Wing H2665; Grolier 462; Pforzheimer 504. N° de réf. du vendeur 20651

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ST DENIS, Antoine?]

Edité par Paris V. Sertenas (1555)

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About this Item: Paris V. Sertenas, 1555. 8vo, ff. [x], 245, [1] privilege; with Sertenas' device on title; a near-invisible hole at foot of title skilfully repaired; some very small wormholes in lower margin of several gatherings; in nineteenth-century French red morocco by Pagnant, inner gilt dentelles, edges gilt. First edition of this collection of prose fiction in a form which became popular in France in the mid-16th century, the conte. Each is preceded by a moral exposition and followed by an admonitory address to the ladies. The combination is typical of Masuccio and indeed nineteen of the fifty-four contes are taken from his Novellini. Like them the others are all based on tales which are devoid of sentiment. This book also seems to exist with the imprint of the bookseller Estienne Groulleau. There were further editions in 1560, 1579 and 1595; the book was rescued from obscurity in the 19th century by Félix Frank's edition (1878), who attributed the work to Antoine St Denis, although others had suggested Abraham de St Dié or André de St Didier. Nothing, however, seems to be known about Antoine St Denis, not even his dates. Brunet II 209; not in BMC French. N° de réf. du vendeur 17617

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COLERIDGE, Samuel Taylor.

Edité par London: printed for John Murray. by William Bulmer and co (1816)

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About this Item: London: printed for John Murray. by William Bulmer and co, 1816. 8vo, pp. vii, [i], 64; bound third in a volume with nine other poems (see below); a fine and attractive volume in early calf, the covers stamped in basket-weave pattern, spine richly gilt, morocco label, marbled endpapers and edges. Early armorial bookplate of the Rev. W.W. Holland, Chichester, and manuscript list of contents (perhaps in his hand) on free endpaper. A splendid volume of poetry, nicely presented with the spine labelled 'Minor Poems'. This is true for all but one of the pamphlets here - nobody today would describe either Christabel or Kubla Khan as 'minor' - but the accompanying poems certainly put Coleridge's two masterpieces into context. All the publications in this volume were issued by the firm of John Murray, at the time when it stood highest among London publishers: Byron was Murray's greatest success, of course, but Scott and Jane Austen were being published by him at exactly this time, as well as many other authors of lesser importance. This collection must have been assembled by going into 50 Albemarle St and picking out a number of current pamphlets that would have interested the buyer. On the other hand, they could well be a present from the publisher: the first owner was the Rev. William Woollams Holland (1785-1855), educated at Oxford and at this time vicar-choral at Chichester Cathedral. More importantly, he was married to Jane Murray (b. 1780), known as Jenny, elder sister of the publisher: they had at least one son, John Murray Holland (1818-77), who was a fellow of New College Oxford, and who followed his father into the church. When the elder John Murray had died in 1793, Jenny and her mother and sisters had gone to live in Shropshire, where she met and married Willam Holland in 1809, but she retained an interest in the family business: Zachs notes that she and her elder brother John were actively pursuing the firm's assets in 1800, at about the time that John gained effective control. The other works bound in here are: 1. [CROLY, George.] PARIS IN 1815. A poem . London: John Murray . 1817. 8vo, pp. [iii]-xii, [iii], 75, [1]. Jackson, Annals, p. 423. First edition 2. SCOTT, Walter. THE FIELD OF WATERLOO; a poem . Edinburgh: printed by James Ballantyne & co, for Archibald Constable and co. Edinburgh; and . John Murray, London. 1815. 8vo, pp. 56. Todd & Bowden 84Aa; Jackson p. 392. First edition. 3. [MALCOLM, Sir John.] PERSIA: A POEM. With notes. Second edition. London . John Murray . 1814. 8vo, pp. [iv], 38. Rare: neither the first nor this edition mentioned in Jackson, Annals. Malcolm (1769-1833) published his standard History of Persia the following year. 4. [KNIGHT, Henry Gally.] ILDERIM: A SYRIAN TALE . London: printed for John Murray . 1816. 8vo, pp. [vi], 74. Jackson p. 406. First edition. 5. HEMANS, Felicia Dorothea. THE RESTORATION OF THE WORKS OF ART TO ITALY: a poem . Second edition. Oxford . for J. Murray . 1816. 8vo, pp. [viii], 37. Jackson p. 412. 6. SMEDLEY, Edward. THE DEATH OF SAUL AND JONATHAN. A poem . London . for John Murray . 1814. 8vo, pp. [viii], 33. Jackson p. 378. First edition. 7. SMEDLEY, Edward. JONAH. A poem . London . for John Murray . 1815. 8vo, pp. [iv], 24, [4]. Jackson p. 394. First edition. 8. SMEDLEY, Edward. JEPHTHAH. A poem . London . .for John Murray . 1814. 8vo, pp. [iv], 27, [1]. Jackson p. 380. First edition. 9. [CROKER, John Wilson.] THE BATTLES OF TALAVERA. A poem . Eighth edition, with some additions. London . for John Murray . 1810. 8vo, frontispiece portrait of Wellington, engraved map and pp. 43; slightly foxed. Jackson p. 335. N° de réf. du vendeur 20173

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COLLINS, William.]

Edité par London: printed for J. Payne at Pope's Head in Pater-noster-Row (1757)

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About this Item: London: printed for J. Payne at Pope's Head in Pater-noster-Row, 1757. 4to, pp. viii, 23, [1] advertisements; final page a little dusty, else a very fine, fresh copy, uncut and disbound. Preserved in a black morocco-backed slipcase, titled in gilt. First edition thus, a retitled edition of Collins's Persian Eclogues, first published in 1742. Collins had originally written the poems when at school at Winchester: they were certainly largely finished by the time he went up to Oxford in 1740. Despite the fact that the first edition sold badly, by the 1750s his poems were gaining a critical reputation, and the youthful eclogues were - to his displeasure - more appreciated than the later and more mature Odes, which he felt better represented his talent. Although it is often presumed that this second edition is a mere reprint with the title altered by one word, in fact Collins made numerous small changes to the text, and the spelling and capitalisation is regularised. This is perhaps indicative not only of the poet's change of mind, but also of a shift in authorial and typographical practice in the intervening fifteen years - and, perhaps, of the effect that Johnson's Dictionary had had upon the language. A very fine copy, uncut. Rothschild 654; Williams, Seven XVIIIth century bibliographies, p. 112. See Lonsdale's edition of the poems (Longman, 1969) for an account of Collins's changes to the text. N° de réf. du vendeur 18777

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COLERIDGE, Samuel Taylor.

Edité par Bristol for the author (1795)

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About this Item: Bristol for the author, 1795. Small 8vo (160 x 95mm), pp. 6, [3], 8-69; a very good copy in a mid-19th century binding of half calf over marbled boards. Bookplate of Robert, Marquess of Crewe. First and only edition of this rare early work by Coleridge, printing two lectures which he had delivered earlier the same year, in January and February, in the Corn Market, Bristol. The first one, on contemporary English Jacobins such as Paine, Godwin and Gerrald, had been printed as A Moral and Political Lecture, but the second one, 'On the Present War', against Pitt and his repressive policies, is first printed here. The series of lectures was suspended after the third lecture, when crowds outside the rooms threatened to disrupt the event. Coleridge's preface nonetheless asserts that 'Truth should be spoken at all times, but more especially at those times, when to speak Truth is dangerous'. This is followed by an ironical letter 'from Liberty to her dear friend Famine'. In between the lectures' delivery and their publication, he had married Sara Fricker on 4 October, and disappeared to their cottage at Clevedon, where they spent the next six weeks: the preface is dated from there, on 16 November. However, as Richard Holmes reveals, the following day he was at a meeting in Bristol, speaking in favour of a petition to the King 'for a speedy Termination of the Present War'. Provenance. Robert Milnes (1858-1945), marquess of Crewe, with his bookplate. He might have inherited this book from his father, Richard Monckton Milnes (Lord Houghton), who left an enormous library that was considerable extended by his son. Wise, Coleridge, 3; Tinker 674. See Holmes, Coleridge: Early Visions, pp. 95-106. N° de réf. du vendeur 21791

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PATIN, Charles.

Edité par In Padova MDCLXXX. Per Gio: Battista Pasquati. Padua G.B. Pasquati (1680)

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About this Item: In Padova MDCLXXX. Per Gio: Battista Pasquati. Padua G.B. Pasquati, 1680. 4to, pp. [iv], 95-113; woodcut ornament on title-page, two engraved head-pieces, 18 medals on 4 copperplates in the text and three large plates, two double-page and one folded horizontally (445 x 137, 215 x 280 and 192 x 265mm; the tall plate neatly repaired at fold); in a recent binding of old vellum. An excellent copy on thick paper. Charles Patin (1633-93) was one of the most famous physicians of his time, as well as a distinguished antiquarian scholar and numismatist whose personal collection of medals was reported to be the equal of the Cabinet du Roi. For political reasons he was forced to leave France, and after travelling in Holland and Germany he settled in Padua from 1677. In this description of the Corpus Christi celebrations Patin incorporates notes on the history of games and festivities involving horses; these include chariot racing, tilting and horse ballets and are illustrated both by medals and the delightful large engravings. These include an enormous altar carried in procession, a plate of jousting on horseback, and one of the festival carriage accompanied by a cavalcade. Lipperheide 2792; Berlin Katalog 3051; Ruggieri Cat. 821. Despite the pagination of 95-113, this is a complete and separate publication with signatures A-C4. N° de réf. du vendeur 17526

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BYRON, Anne Isabella, Lady.]

Edité par London February or March (1830)

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About this Item: London February or March, 1830. 8vo, pp. 15; a single sheet, uncut, unopened, and never bound. An extremely rare piece of Byroniana. This is the very rare first edition of Lady Byron's riposte to the account of the breakdown of her marriage, as related in Moore's biography of her husband, which appeared early in 1830. On 10 March, Lady Byron wrote to Mrs Villiers, explaining her purpose in having the pamphlet printed: 'My wish is to place the copy only in the hands of those who will make a discreet use of it, and prevent the possibility of its insertion in the Newspapers at present. I think I shall not send out more than a dozen at first'. There was a second printing (slightly shorter in length, only 13pp), and Wise deduced from this letter that only 'a dozen or so' of this first edition were printed, the subsequent edition being called for when it was decided to circulate it more widely. However, this seems a step too far and it may be that 20-30 of this edition were in fact printed, though there's little doubt that most of them were sent out by the Anne Isabella herself. Despite this, and the fact that the pamphlet has her name printed at the end, the text has often been attributed to Thomas Campbell, apparently because he used its text in an article later the same year. Even if he did write it, it's clear that Anne Isabella was content that it should be thought hers, and took an active part in its distribution, as several copies are known with her presentation letters attached. This copy is inscribed to 'Lady William Russell' in a contemporary hand at top right of the title page; and at bottom left 'unpublished' in the same hand: this certainly resembles Lady Byron's handwriting, particularly in the use of the long s in 'Russell', which would have been quite an old-fashioned habit by 1830. Lady William Russell can be identified as the wife of Lord George William Russell (1790-1846), son of the 6th Duke of Bedford, a career army officer and diplomat. She had been Elizabeth Anne Rawdon (1793-1874), beautiful and vivacious, opinionated and dominating. Byron himself had apparently known her and alluded to her in Beppo as the only woman he had known whose 'bloom could after dancing dare the dawn'. Byron then adds: 'The name of this Aurora I'll not mention, Although I might, for she was naught to me'. Ashley Library IX pp. 50-51; Tinker 588. N° de réf. du vendeur 20224

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PHILIPPS, Janetta.

Edité par Oxford printed by Collingwood and co (1811)

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About this Item: Oxford printed by Collingwood and co, 1811. 8vo, pp. [xii], 68; a little spotted but generally a very good copy, in contemporary tree calf, spine gilt, joints cracked. Sole edition of a rare volume of poems by Janetta Philipps, issued by subscription: the list of those who patronised the publication is quite substantial, amounting to pre-publication orders for over 500 copies. Although almost nothing is known about Janetta Philipps herself, the subscription list is on its own quite informative: she presumably lived in Oxford, as there is a good preponderance of university and town names taking copies, but there is also a fair number from Somerset, notably from Bridgewater but also including Taunton, Stowey, Pawlet and Queen Camel. She must have been well-connected in high society, because there are several titled subscribers, led by the Duke and Duchess of Marlborough but also including the Earl of Dysart, Lord and Lady Bagot, the Earl of Stamford and so on. The most notable name on the list, however, is that of 'Mr. P.B. Shelley', who took six copies; other members of his family were also subscribers, such as his sisters Elizabeth and Hellen, and friends such as Thomas Medwin, Edward Graham and his future wife Harriet Westbrook (they were to elope in August the same year). Shelley took six copies, but this is not the end of his interest in the book: we know from a letter to Miss Philipps, written on 16 May of this year from the family home at Field Place, that he saw the manuscript of her poems before publication, and that he 'offered to print the Mss. at my own expence' (Letters I p. 88). When he wrote that letter, Shelley was in disgrace: he had been sent down from Oxford in late March, but had presumably been able to see the MS in Oxford through the good graces of his friend Strong, who is mentioned in the letter too. A subsequent letter, perhaps written later the same month (I p. 89), reacts forcefully to a letter she had written to him, which seems to have protested against the publication of his Necessity of Atheism (which he had mentioned in his previous letter). He did not forget her after this: next month he wrote to Hogg saying that Miss Philipps had 'twice the genius' of his sister Elizabeth (after whom Hogg was currently hankering). There is, however, no evidence that they were in touch after this and his interest in her was as transient as was that he took in the young Felicia Dorothea Browne (later Mrs Hemans). One feature of the book intriguingly suggests that this may not be Philipps's only publication: pp. 31-2 carry a poem headed 'Stanzas inserted in the novel of Delaval', which begins: 'Then teach me, ah! teach me that pang to subdue'. This set of five four-line stanzas does indeed appear on p. 117 of the anonymous gothic novel Delaval, published by the Minerva Press in 1802. No attribution has hitherto been made for the authorship of this piece of fiction, but it seems reasonable to suggest that Janetta Philipps could well have been responsible for it. See Garside, Raven & Schöwerling II p. 146 and Blakey, Minerva Press, p. 202. Jackson, Romantic Poetry by Women, p. 256. No copy of this book seems to have been sold at auction in the past forty years. Copac locates copies at the BL, Bodleian and NLS; there are also copies at Harvard, NYPL and Yale. Provenance. This copy belonged to an Oxford woman reader some twenty years after publication: it has the ownership inscription on the upper pastedown of Mary Barnett, Holywell St, Oxford, dated 1831. She must be the wife or daughter of Thomas Barnett, who kept a livery stables in Holywell (see Pigot's 1830 trade directory for Oxford): presumably he was prosperous, because when he died in 1841 he was designated 'gentleman'. N° de réf. du vendeur 19350

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KETT, Henry, owner.]

Edité par London Oxford and Cambridge -95 (1758)

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About this Item: London Oxford and Cambridge -95, 1758. Nine works in one volume, 4to, listed separately below. Nicely bound in late 18th century half calf over marbled boards, a bit rubbed but very sound. A fine volume of mostly academic poetry, much of it published in the 1780s and put together by the aspiring poet Henry Kett (1761-1825), fellow of Trinity College Oxford. Kett himself published some poetry, and attempted to become Professor of Poetry at Oxford in 1793 and again in 1802. He was a well-respected tutor and the author of several books, as well as being a notable wit. In this volume of nine works, although only one of them is noted as a presentation copy (item 4, from George Richards), it is very likely that several others were too, as almost all of the authors were academic contemporaries at the two universities. There is a list of contents on the flyleaf, quite probably by Kett himself. The volume was later bought by John Johnson (d. 1831), Fellow of Magdalen Oxford, who has noted on the flyleaf 'Purchased at a Sale probably at Mr Ketts'. In the twentieth century the book belonged to H.W. Luttman-Johnson (perhaps a descendant), a proto-fascist and associate of Oswald Mosley who was interned during World War II. The separate pieces are: 1. LIPSCOMB, William. POEMS . Oxford: printed for J. Walter . London. Sold also by D. Prince and J. Cooke in Oxford; and J. Todd in York. 1784. 4to, pp. [iv], iii, [i], 111. Lipscomb (1754-1842) was at Corpus, Oxford, and graduated in 1774, having won a prize for English verse in 1772. 2. CROWE, William. LEWESDON HILL. A poem . The second edition. Oxford: at the Clarendon Press, 1788. Sold by D. Prince and J. Cooke, Oxford; J.F. and C. Rivington, T. Cadell, and R. Faulder, London. 4to, pp. [vi], 28, [1]. Crowe (1745-1829) was a Fellow of New College and Public Orator from 1784. 3. RICHARDS, George. MODERN FRANCE: A POEM . Oxford: sold by J. Cooke; by G.G.J. and J. Robinson [etc] . London; and W. Lunn, Cambridge. 1793. 4to, pp. 18, [1]. Inscribed 'Mr Kett' at head of title in a contemporary hand. George Richards (1767-1837) had been at Christ's Hospital with Charles Lamb and then went on to Trinity College under Kett - he was very probably tutored by him. This poem expressing horror at the excesses of the French Revolution could well be a presentation copy from the author, who was by this time a fellow of Oriel. 4. RICHARDS, George. MATILDA; OR THE DYING PENITENT: a poetical epistle . Oxford: printed for J. Cooke, and sold by G.G. and J. Robinson [etc] . London. 1795. 4to, pp. 20. Inscribed 'The Gift of the Author Feb 7 1795' at head of title page. 5. TWEDDELL, John. JUVENUM CURAS. [colophon:] In comitiis maximis. Jul. 7, 1789. Joannes Tweddell, Trinitatis Collegii Scholaris apud Cantab. [Cambridge, 1789] 4to, pp. 4; in Greek throughout except for title and colophon; early MS note on first page. Very rare: ESTC locates just two copies, at the BL and Bodleian only (although there is now a third copy known, at Trinity Cambridge). John Tweddell (1769-99) was an outstanding student at Trinity College Cambridge, where he became a fellow in 1793 - these Greek verses were published while he was still an undergraduate were presumably circulated privately. He was a passionate revolutionary and moved in Godwin's circle, meeting George Dyer, Thomas Holcroft and even William Wordsworth. He travelled widely in the 1790s spent much of his energy recording Greek antiquities; on his death in Athens in 1799 he apparently left a large collection of drawings and notes that later disappeared. As ODNB states, 'In death Tweddell became almost a mythical figure, with many laments at the genius cut off before it could show itself. Lord Byron was among those who in 1810 marked his grave with a block of marble from the Parthenon.' 6. LOWTH, Thomas Henry. REI NAUTICAE INCREMENTA. [Oxford, 1773] 4to, pp. [ii], 10. Lowth was born in 1753 and was the eldest son of the churchman Robert Lowth, who by the time his son went up was Bishop of Oxford. The young man promised well, but he died young in 1778. This piece - very likely a prize poem from his undergraduate career - celebrates nautical achievements, including those of Columbus, Vasco da Gama, Drake, Anson and Byron. 7. CHAPPELOW, Leonard, translator. THE TRAVELLER: AN ARABIC POEM, INTITLED TOGRAI, written by Abu-Ismael; translted into Latin and publish'd with notes in 1661 . now render'd into English in the same iambic measure as the original; with some additional noes to illustrate the poem . Cambridge, printed by J. Bentham printer to the University . 1758. 4to, pp. [ii], 38. One of the few ventures into poetry of the orientalist Leonard Chappelow (d. 1768): according to ODNB it 'inaugurates the Cambridge tradition of turning Arabic poetry into English verse'. 8. KNIGHT, Samuel. ELEGIES AND SONNETS . London: printed for T. Cadell, in the Strand. 1785. 4to, pp. [ii], v-70; last leaf with short internal tear (no loss). Probably not wanting the half title, as the title page is a cancel and both half title and title were probably cancelled at the same time. A rare volume by Samuel Knight (1754-1829), who had been at Trinity Cambridge but was later at the Middle Temple. This is a reissue of the original work, with a cancel title page identifying the author. No copy of either issue in the British Library. 9. [MONRO, Thomas?] MELE EPHEMERIA [graece] . Oxford: printed for the author: and sold by Mess. Fletcher, bookseller, in the Turle; and by W. Jackson, in Oxford. 1783. 4to, pp. [viii], 36. The manuscript list of contents on the flyleaf identifies this as 'Monro's Mele Ephemeria', and it is almost certainly by Thomas Monro (1764-1815), then still only 19 and an undergraduate at Magdalen College: Monro founded and edited the Oxford periodical Olla Podrida (1784-87), to which Henry Kett contributed. The work has a list of subscribers - almost all Oxford men - and consists of English, Latin and Greek verses. N° de réf. du vendeur 17059

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VIENNA.]

Edité par Wien in Oesterreich gedruckt bey Johann Peter v. Ghelen. Vienna J.P. von Ghelen (1739)

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About this Item: Wien in Oesterreich gedruckt bey Johann Peter v. Ghelen. Vienna J.P. von Ghelen, 1739. Folio in twos, one very large folding plate (290 x 960 mm) as frontispiece, three double-page plates and six single-page plates; some by Elias Schaffhausser; bound in contemporary calf, a little scuffed; some limited worming at the foot of the gutters of the double-page plates, just touching the engraved surface of one. An attractive record of the rifle-shooting contest staged in Vienna in 1739. The engraved illustrations, three of which are by Elias Schaffhausser after Franz Tobias Kollman (one other is signed by 'An. & Jo. Schmuzer'), show the various stages in the fortnight-long match. The large folding plate shows the procession of carriages arriving at the pavilion on the range; a jester accompanies them. The double-page plates depict the royal ladies taking coffee, and the presentation of the trophy. The other plates show each of the six targets. These were imaginative and decorative: the bullseye, for example, being placed on the hub of Fortune's wheel or on the nose of a Lippizaner in mid-capriole. Lipperheide 3002; the Getty online catalogue lists a copy without the folding plate. N° de réf. du vendeur 17206

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About this Item: Leyden F. Hack -6, 1655. Two volumes, 4to (leaves 242 x 190mm), pp. [xvi], 716; 536, [44] index homericus; pagination including the engraved title page in volume I; also with two engraved frontispieces, both by Schiavonetti, added at a later date; a very fine copy in full green morocco (probably English, around 1800), with spines gilt, gilt plain borders on covers, gilt turn-ins surrounding tan morocco pastedowns; marbled paper for free endleaves. First edition of this edition of the Iliad and Odyssey, in the original Greek and with Latin notes by Cornelius Schrevelius (1608-64). This has long been regarded as a fine edition, but this is a large paper copy, and comes from a distinguished line of collectors. Provenance 1. Janus Broukhusius (1649-1707), the latinised name of Joan van Broekhuizen, Dutch scholar and editor of classical texts, with his ownership inscription at the head of the title page in volume I: 'Jani Broukhusii'. A few notes in the margin of the title page and the preceding endpaper may be in his hand. Broukhusius was a very considerable collector, and his library was sold at auction in Amsterdam in May 1708. 2. 'W:S: 1803', written in an English hand on an endpaper in volume I, with 'C.P.' opposite. 3. George Spencer-Churchill (1766-1840), who in 1817 became the 5th Duke of Marlborough but is known to bibliophily as the Marquis of Blandford. His famous library at White Knights near Reading had to be dispersed in 1819 because of his debts, by the auctioneer Thomas Evans. Notoriously spendthrift, Blandford had fought off competition at the Roxburghe sale (1812) to secure the 'Valdarfer Boccaccio' for £2260, a price record that stood for more than seventy years. The inscription of the next owner, Henry Drury (see below) clearly implies that this is the same copy - and indeed lot 1956 in the White Knights sale was a large paper copy of this book, and also had the two Schiavonetti plates inserted. As the catalogue states that that it was bound in red morocco, one might doubt this to be the same book - however, the auctioneer's file copy of the sale at the British Library does indeed show the buyer to have been 'Drury'. 4. Henry Drury (1778-1841), who like Lord Blandford was a founding member of the Roxburghe Club, and was a book collector of more modest means (and of better-controlled ambition). A clergyman scholar, Drury taught at Harrow, where Byron was one of his pupils, and although a renowned classicist he never produced the books he might have written or edited, instead putting his energies into book collecting. Drury has written two notes, one in English and French and the other in Latin, suggesting that this copy comes from White Knights, and quoting Brunet's opinion about the rarity of the large paper issue. 5. Acccording to Brunet (in, obviously, the later edition), Drury's copy fetched £13.5s when sold in 1827, but was 'revend 561 fr. à Paris, en 1829'. If so, the book returned to London again, some decades later and at a lower price, because this copy was bought at Sotheby's on 21 July 1857 for £7.10s: it was lot 451 in the second day of the sale of the library of 'a well-known collector' (who was apparently le Baron de St Victor), bought by 'C. Butler'. The large paper copies of this edition are, according to Brunet, particularly sought-after: 'Il y a des exempl. en Gr. Pap. regardés avec raison comme très-rares; celui de M. Caillard a été vend. 451 fr; il avait 243 millim. de hauteur sur 191 de largeur; nous en donnons la mesure, parce que sans cela les personnes qui n'ont pas été à même de voir les deux papiers, reconnaitraient difficilement le plus grand'. Binding Finely bound in early 19th century green morocco: when sold in 1857, the binding was attributed to Charles Smith, but there is no ticket or stamp anywhere in the volumes that I can find. Brunet III 272-3. N° de réf. du vendeur 22114

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GESNER, Conrad.

Edité par Tiguri Zürich excudebat Christoph. Frosch (1577)

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About this Item: Tiguri Zürich excudebat Christoph. Frosch, 1577. Two parts in one volume, small 4to, ff. [viii], 140; 28; with printer's device on titles and three full-page woodcut illustrations in the second part; both title-pages strengthened (with paper patches, where stamps possibly removed, on versos); early binding with vellum spine (lettered in ink) and sides made from old musical MS. First edition. The first part of this work consists of a large number of letters from Gesner (and, on a few occasions, to him) to various eminent botanists, physicians, scientists and scholars of his time throughout Europe. Amongst those with whom Gesner corresponded were Johann Crato von Krafftheim, Achilles Pirminus Gasser (editor of Peregrinus's De Magnete, with whom he discussed the magnet), Adolf Occo (to whom he wrote in both Greek and Latin), Felix Platter, Theodor Zwinger and Leonhard Fuchs. 'These 226 letters on a wide variety of medical topics, edited by Caspar Wolf, Gesner's literary executor, and published posthumously, indicate the wide interests and scientific insights of this great Renaissance scholar. The book contains two botanical tracts and three fine woodcuts of plants from Gesner's huge collection of drawings and woodcuts of plants which were to form the illustrative portion of his projected history of plants' (Heirs of Hippocrates). These illustrations, of which Gesner had drawn and collected some 1500, were prepared for a proposed monumental treatise, an Opera Botanica, which he never finished. He entrusted Caspar Wolf with the project, but Wolf was not able to fulfil his commission. He sold the material, including some blocks already cut, to Johann Camerarius the younger and these later came into the hands of C.J. Trew.Some of them were published by Schmiedel in the 18th century, but the printing here of the three blocks is remarkable in being near-contemporary. These cuts appear in the second part of the work, which has a separate title page. It is a monograph (taken from the proposed Opera Botanica) on aconites and hellebore - indeed, it is the first monograph on these plants. Provenance. Nicholas Franchimont a Frankenfeld, with his ownership inscription and monogram on first title, and his underlinings and marginal MS annotations. Franchimont a Frankenfeld (1611-84) was professor of medicine at Prague. Amongst other medical topics, he wrote on lithotomy. Adams G526; Bird 1062; Durling 2067; Heirs of Hippocrates 186; Hunt 129; Parkinson & Lumb 1004; Waller 3521; Wellcome I 2805; Wellisch 3.1. N° de réf. du vendeur 9233

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About this Item: London: printed for P. Elmsly in the Strand and J. Robson in New Bond-Street, 1783. Three works in one volume, 4to, pp. vii, [i], 23; [iv], 28; 18; the second poem signed in ink (on p. [iv]) by the author with his initials A.K. ('the better to prevent surreptitious copies'); finely bound in full red morocco gilt by Riviere (neatly rebacked, preserving original spine), gilt edges and turn-ins, plain dark blue endpapers. First edition of Goldsmith's Deserted Village, one of the most famous poems of the century - a brilliantly evocative and socially reflective poem with lines that many who have never read it will nonetheless find familiar: 'Ill fares the land, to hastening ills a prey, Where wealth accumulates, and men decay' (p. 4). The last four lines, supplied by Goldsmith's close friend Samuel Johnson, are also plangent. This is the true first edition, and in fine complete condition, with the half title. Bound with this are two early imitations, much less common than the original. Anthony King (1742-97) was the son of a future Lord Mayor of Dublin, Sir Anthony King, and had been educated at Trinity College; he must have read for the English bar, but later in life practised in Dublin. This is his earliest known work, dedicated to Goldsmith '(in whose acquaintance he is personally honoured)'. He took precautions against piracy by signing copies on the back of the title page - his fears seem to have been well-founded, as an unauthorised edition 'printed by Obadiah Pirate, in Black-Boy-Alley' is also known, and perhaps had preceded this printing. Of this authorised edition, ESTC locates no copy at the BL and just four copies in England; and five copies in North America (Harvard, McMaster, Yale, Illinois and Minnesota). Later still, there were two more piracies produced in Dublin (1784 and 1797). The third book in this volume is by the American writer Thomas Coombe (1747-1822). Born in Philadelphia, Coombe was ordained into the Church of England and felt that this barred him from disloyalty to the Crown by supporting American independence: he sailed to England in 1779 and spent the rest of his life in Britain and Ireland - just before this poem was written, he had been chaplain to Lord Carlisle as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, and the poem combines his experiences of Ireland and America. The poem pictures Edwin, who has been exiled from his native land, coming to America, the promised country of hope and plenty; but there he only finds war and danger: 'Brothers 'gainst brothers rise in vengeful strife, The parent's weapon drinks the children's life . Here, as I trace my melancholy way, The prowling Indian snuffs his wonted prey. Ha - should I meet him in his dusky round - Late in these woods I heard his murderous sound - Still the deep war-whoop vibrates on mine ear, And still I hear his tread, or seem to hear .' (pp. 16-17). Goldsmith: Rothschild 1032; Temple Scott p. 248; Williams, p. 147. Coombe: Adams, American Controversy, 83-27. N° de réf. du vendeur 18291

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DRYDEN, John.

Edité par London printed for J. Tonson (1682)

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About this Item: London printed for J. Tonson, 1682. Folio (283 x 180mm), a single sheet; the inner edge rough (perhaps where removed from an original composite volume), short slit at foot not affecting text; in fine condition. In a new red half morocco folding case. First edition. A separately issued prologue by Dryden to a play by Thomas Southerne; he also contributed the epilogue, 'spoken by Mrs. Sarah Crook', which is printed on the verso. Neither poem is attributed to Dryden in the original edition of the full text of this play. The separate printing of prologues and epilogues during the Restoration served a dual purpose. Some were no doubt sold as a kind of souvenir programme for those attending performances of the play; others, as here, were used as a kind of propaganda, reflecting the highly politicised atmosphere of the theatre at this period. Thomas Southerne (1660-1746), the son of a Dublin brewer, first came to London in 1680, with the intention of pursuing a career in the law. 'Right from the start his chief interest was not the law but the theatre, and in 1682 he prevailed on the management of Drury Lane to stage his first play, The Loyal Brother . The play, like many others of that times, pillories Shaftesbury and exalts the reputation of James, Duke of York, as the 'loyal brother' - all this in the most transparent and facile political allegory' (Oxford DNB). Dryden's contributions to a youngster's theatrical debut reveal a shared political stance from the start, in no uncertain terms: Poets, like Lawfull Monarchs, rul'd the stage, Till Criticks, like Damn'd Whiggs, debauch'd our Age. Mark how they jump: Criticks would regulate Our Theatres, and Whiggs reform our State: Both pretend love, and both (Plague rot 'em) hate. Macdonald was able to trace only 14 separately printed prologues and epilogues by Dryden, all of which are now extremely difficult to find; the last copy of this one we can trace on the market was sold in 1982. Wing D2341; Macdonald 97. N° de réf. du vendeur 20648

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About this Item: Venice Giorgio del Rusconi, 1521. Small 8vo, ff. XXXII; title page within woodcut borders; device of de Rusconibus on last page; side-notes on one page in sig. A and six in sig D cut into, and foliation similarly affected on a couple of leaves, else a good copy, in a modern vellum binding. Second edition, considerably enlarged: the first had appeared in Pavia in 1519, and these are the only two editions, at least under this title. Here the added material includes at least four preliminary letters written since the first edition; and appearing for the first time too is the long letter on the baths at Abano Terme (near Padua) mentioned on the title-page. Friedrich Nausea (c. 1480-1552) was born Friedrich Grau in Waischenfeld ('Blancicampiani' on the title page here) and was educated at Leipzig; he first visited Italy in 1518. He joined the circle of Lorenzo Campeggi and was prominent in enforcing the Edict of Worms against Luther, but he also become a warm admirer of Erasmus, and was eventually appointed Bishop of Vienna in succession to Johannes Fabri in 1541. He died at Trent in 1552 whilst attending the Council there. His poetry was clearly highly regarded by contemporary scholars and humanists. Both of the early editions of this book are very rare: COPAC locates only the BL copies, and EDIT 16 records none of the first and just seven of this edition. N° de réf. du vendeur 17494

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About this Item: Paris Robert Estienne I 12 January, 1519. Two works in one volume, folio (310 x 200mm), both titles with letterpress text within fine woodcut compartments; ff. 224; 198, [4]; good large copies, in a rather dull but very sound modern institutional binding of tan half morocco, spine lettered in gilt. Original (or at least very early) foredge inscription 'Opera Dionysij et Damasc:' preserved. Two editions which, despite being dated four years apart, are sometimes found in the same volume. St John of Damascus's De Orthodoxa Fide is in a translation by Lefèvre d'Étaples, with a commentary by Josse Clichtove; it had been published by Henri Estienne in 1512, and this is, as the title page says, Estienne's 'secunda æmissio'. It is, however, oddly scarce and is not noticed by Renouard - the 1512 edition is far more frequently met with. Both works are fine copies, with an attractive early British provenance. Dionysius: Renouard p. 16, no. 3; Adams D523; Cathedral Libraries Catalogue D634. John: not in Renouard or in Adams; Cathedral Libraries Catalogue J291. Provenance. This book was in Britain at a very early date. A contemporary inscription, lightly deleted, at the head of the title page appears to read 'Augustinij Bernlye' (the surname being very hard to read: it could be Berry or another more obscure name). This is very likely to be an Englishman. Certainly the following inscription, in a late 16th c hand, reading 'xpors Bulwer', with price 6s.8d., cannot be other than English, and the writer (whose first name must be Christopher) must have been an educated man whom one would assume to have attended university. However, this surname, which is very clear, does not appear at either Oxford or Cambridge at this date - at least, certainly not with this Christian name. There are quite a few notes in the margins of the Dionysius, in at least two 16th century hands; and on the blank preliminary leaf facing the title page a note in English which is quoting 'Mor. against ye masse'. This is probably a reference to the attack on the Roman Catholic mass by Thomas Morton (1564-1659), Bishop of Durham, Of the institution of the sacrament of the blessed bodie and blood of Christ, first published in 1631. N° de réf. du vendeur 22146

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About this Item: London: printed for T. Cadell in the Strand, 1774. Together ten works in one volume, all 4to; contemporary or early calf, rebacked. Early bookplate of John Oxley of Norwich. A very interesting assemblage of poetry of the 1770s, including much typical verse of the kind popular in that decade (legendary tales and so forth). The poets represented include such figures as Edward Jerningham, William Julius Mickle, John Nott and Hall Hartson - all of them of interest, and some of these pieces quite scarce. Most important of all, however, is the inclusion of the first edition of Hannah More's first work, a very scarce poem entitled A Search after Happiness, which was published in Bristol in 1773. ESTC online lists only fifteen copies of this work by 'a Young Lady'. The edition is undated, and although More's biographer in ODNB suggests that it was first printed in Bristol in 1762, there seems to be no ground for believing that this book was printed significantly earlier than 1773, when a second edition, 'with additions' and with the same imprint (but more pages), appeared. For the second and subsequent editions, the title was changed to 'The Search .'. This pastoral dialogue between characters such as Euphelia, Pastorella and Laurinda was written when More was in her teens and intended for the use of the school which the More sisters kept at Park St, Bristol. The preface states that it was written 'several years ago (the Author's age eighteen)', and that it is only published now because some 'mutilated copies' had been circulated. The work is dedicated to Mrs Gwatkin, a neighbour whose daughter was at the school, and who later provided her with an entrée into London society. The last leaves of the publication print two prologues spoken by Mr Powell at the theatre at Jacob's Well in the 1760s. A complete list of the volume is available on request. N° de réf. du vendeur 18279

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TRAVELLER, Reuben.

Edité par London: printed and sold by F. Bridgewater. sold also by Hatchard. Amies etc. and at the author's Homer Row Winchester Row (1814)

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About this Item: London: printed and sold by F. Bridgewater. sold also by Hatchard. Amies etc. and at the author's Homer Row Winchester Row, 1814. 8vo, pp. 54, [2] blank; a minor tear in F1 (no loss); uncut and unopened in the original drab boards, spine missing but stitching still sound. First and apparently only edition, and very rare: only four copies have so far been traced. Reuben Traveller (apparently this was his real name, and not a pseudonym), was born in Marylebone in 1788, and ended his life in Bytown, Ottawa, in 1861; he is buried in a local cemetery. He went to sea as a young man and is thought to have been a cabin boy or midshipman on Nelson's flagship Victory, or at least on a ship in the Trafalgar fleet. Married in 1807, he emigrated to Philadelphia in about 1820; but he could reasonably be considered a Canadian poet, as he lived in Ottawa from 1825 until his death more than thirty years later, becoming (amongst other things) both town crier and town clerk for Bytown. He clearly exaggerated his age, because his obituary in the Richmond Daily Dispatch (21 March 1861) says that he was in his eighty-first year, when in fact he was a few days short of 73; but it seems almost certain that he did accompany Mungo Park on his last voyage, although obviously not to the tragic and obscure end, tracing the course of the Niger river, in early 1806. However, the poet can only have been in his mid-teens at the time. The present poem recounts Traveller's experiences on the sloop Eugene, under the command of Captain Webb, as the ship sails down the Atlantic coast, across the Bay of Biscay and down to Gambia. There are colourful descriptions of dolphins, monkeys and native inhabitants. At one point the captain invites a chieftain on board: A chief of Gambia's banks our captain dines: Like polish'd ebony his person shines; His retinue were hundreds (like himself, Unexercis'd in knives or English delf); When fowls are serv'd, they quarter them with fist, And joints they dislocate with strength of wrist. (p. 41) Among the interesting circumstantial details are a long prose footnote on Park's character (pp. 39-40). Not in Jackson, Annals of English verse; Copac and WorldCat locate only the copies at the BL, Aberdeen and Edinburgh universities, and the Huntington. N° de réf. du vendeur 20222

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CROTTI, Elio Giulio.

Edité par Mantua Venturino Ruffinello (1545)

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About this Item: Mantua Venturino Ruffinello, 1545. 8vo, ff. 75, [1] blank, [1] title to second part, 76-102; set in italics throughout; four leaves in first part and four at beginning of second part rather browned, marginal stain in last leaf of index; in early nineteenth-century calf-backed marbled boards. Only edition of this collection of neo-Latin verse. The first part is divided into three books and contains elegiac pieces, many of them addressed to contemporaries. The second part contains poems written in a variety of verse-forms, mainly lighthearted. Among these are a number of erotic poems, some of them extremely explicit. Crotti (the name is also sometimes given as Crotto) was born in Cremona in about 1495 but lived mainly in Mantua, and also in Ferrara, where he died in about 1582. This appears to be the first of his two most notable books, the other being his Opuscula (Ferrara, 1564). Not in BMC Italian or in Adams. N° de réf. du vendeur 17296

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About this Item: Messina Giacomo Mattei, 1647. 8vo; 128 pp. italic type for the verse, roman for the notes; some inkspots on title-page, an almost imperceptible waterstain in the last gathering but a very nice copy in 19th century vellum, red labels. Sole edition, and notoriously rare, of this strange work whose author has never been identified - although there is general agreement that Zanclaius is a pseudonym. Divided into thirty-five sections in macaronic verse, each sermon is preceded by keyed annotations. These explanatory notes are in macaronic prose. N° de réf. du vendeur 17661

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About this Item: London : printed for John and Henry L. Hunt Tavistock Street Covent Garden. 1824, 1824. Two volumes (the first volume containing three originally separate works), 8vo, pp. [ii], [iii]-222, [2] advertisements; [iii]-xvii, [i], 103, [1] colophon; vi, [ii], 92, [4] advertisements; xi, [i], 415; with a plate in the second work; margin torn in pp. ix-x of second volume, with some early notes on pp. x, 187 and 232; bound in mid-19th century half calf over marbled boards (rubbed, but very sound), with morocco labels. Modern bookplates of Panos Grafsos Skinos. A most interesting collection. The first volume collects three separate pieces: Rosalind and Helen (1819), Prometheus Unbound (1820) and The Cenci (1821). The first two are first editions, the last is a second edition: all were originally published by Charles Ollier, and are here republished by Ollier in conjunction with Simpkin and Marshall. (There is another version of this collection which includes Hellas, 1822.) The second volume is a posthumous collection made by the Hunts in 1824, but both essentially are volumes of the same nature (and, indeed, same appearance) designed to cash in on the death of the poet in July 1822. Wise, Shelley Library, pp. 69-70. N° de réf. du vendeur 20186

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BOCCHI, Achille.

Edité par Bologna Giovanni Rossi for the Società Tipografica Bolognese (1574)

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About this Item: Bologna Giovanni Rossi for the Società Tipografica Bolognese, 1574. 4to (210 x 155mm), pp. [xlviii], CCCLVII, [1]; woodcut device of the Society on title-page and 151 engraved illustrations; early inscription cut from title page (repaired, with no loss of printed area); else an unusually nice, clean copy in contemporary limp vellum, lacks ties, skilfully rebacked, new endpapers. Second edition: first published at Bologna in 1555 by Bocchi's own academy. In this edition Bonasone's engravings were retouched by the young Agostino Carracci, elder brother of the more famous Annibale: this book was published the year that Agostino began his career, at the age of 17, as an apprentice to Domenico Tibaldi. Great attention to detail characterises this book: as Mortimer points out, the plates were retouched by Carracci whilst it was in the press, and there is evidence of close reading of the text by the printer, with manuscript corrections on ff. C4r, E2r and 2A1r, some of which are corrected in later states of these leaves. Prospero Fontana's designs are often obscure in their iconography: their sources have not yet been fully identified. Two of the most striking are on pp. 166 and 168: they are apparently after a lost drawing of Jupiter abducting Ganymede, made by Michelangelo for Tommaso Cavalieri - see the exhibition catalogue Michelangelo and His Influence (1996, no. 15) where Paul Joannides summarises current critical opinion on the drawing, copies and engravings. Other designs have been identified as being after Raphael and Giulio Romano. These striking illustrations have been shown to have influenced Blake and Samuel Palmer after more than two centuries of neglect. This is the first production of Società Tipografica Bolognese, which was established in 1572 under the direction of Giovanni Rossi, and which existed for ten years. A list of its publications is given in La bibliofila, 23 (1921-22), pp. 95-105. BMC Italian p. 112; Adams B2195; Harvard Mortimer (Italian) 77. N° de réf. du vendeur 17211

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GREGORY, of Nazianzus, St., attributed author.

Edité par Rome Antonio Blado (1542)

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About this Item: Rome Antonio Blado, 1542. 8vo, ff. [iii], 48, bound without the original blank leaf after title; printed in Greek throughout, except for the title, dedication and colophon; a very fine copy in early 19th century olive morocco, flat spine lettered in gilt, gilt fillet borders on covers; red endpapers. Editio princeps of the original Greek text of Christus Patiens, a sacred drama attributed at this time to St Gregory of Nazianzus (329-390), the monastic contemporary of St Basil. The drama is now known to be by another hand, but for many years it was published as an original work by Gregory. The edition carries a dedicatory letter from Antonio Blado to Cardinal Marcello Cervino. The supposed example of St Gregory encouraged Milton in the composition of his great classical drama Samson Agonistes, as he wrote in his preface: 'Gregory Nazianzen a Father of the Church, thought it not unbeseeming the sanctity of his person to write a tragedy, which he entitled, Christ Suffering. This is mentioned to vindicate tragedy from the small esteem, or rather infamy, which in the account of many it undergoes at this day with other common interludes'. Provenance. The Jesuits at Rome, with what looks to be a 17th century inscription at head of title page. The note continues 'ex lego. ep. Zacynthij / B. Com.', which presumably means that it was bequeathed to them by the Bishop of Zakynthos (the Greek island, whose diocese had in fact long been united with that of Cephalonia), or, possibly, a Bishop named Zacynthius. In the early 19th century the book was owned by John Mitford (1781-1859), literary scholar, with his ownership inscription dated 1825 and also February 1832 (perhaps when he read or reread the book). Mitford was an ordained cleric and held the living of Benhall in Suffolk for almost fifty years, but his abiding interest was in literary studies, and he edited many works for Pickering's Aldine classics. He has annotated the endpaper here with references to Lambecius and to Warton's History of English Poetry (perhaps a passage on Milton). Mitford's very fine library was sold after his death by Sotheby's in three sales. This book was the first of three books in lot 746 (the others were two later editions of the same text) in the first sale, which began on 17 December 1859. The lot was bought by 'Nattali' for 10s, and Butler appears to have bought all three from 'N & B', i.e. Nattali & Bond, on 13 December 1859 (he must have got the date wrong) for 15s. Adams G1143; Brunet II 1729, 'Édition rare'. EDIT16 locates nine copies in Italian libraries, but the book is rare elsewhere outside the oldest libraries: the only copies I can trace in North America are at Harvard, Yale and UCLA. N° de réf. du vendeur 22115

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SHELLEY, Percy Bysshe.

Edité par Italy. Printed for C. and J. Ollier Vere Street Bond Street. London (1819)

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About this Item: Italy. Printed for C. and J. Ollier Vere Street Bond Street. London, 1819. 8vo (210 x 130mm), pp. xiv, 104; apart from some light spotting, a very clean copy (possibly washed), rebound in full red crushed morocco by Sangorski & Sutcliffe, spine lettered in gilt, edges gilt, pink endpapers. First edition: the only work by Shelley to be reprinted in his lifetime. This verse drama was printed for Shelley in Leghorn (Livorno),in an edition of only 250 copies, in the summer of 1819; it does not seem to have been actually published until the following year. A very good copy of a rare and sought-after book. Ashley V 69. N° de réf. du vendeur 21880

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About this Item: 1796. Together six volumes, 4to (each volume approx. 225 x 160mm), uniformly bound in contemporary red straight-grain morocco, spines nicely gilt and lettered directly onto spines, boards with roll-tool borders, drab endpapers, edges gilt. (A little rubbed on joints and at corners.) Bookplate in each volume of Mr. Edward Kinnersly. A very fine set of four works by Samuel Ireland, one of the most prolific promoters of 'picturesque' travel of the closing years of the 18th century. N° de réf. du vendeur 21883

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SWIFT, Jonathan.]

Edité par Dublin printed: London re-printed: and sold by T. Cooper at the Globe in Pater-Noster-Row (1738)

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About this Item: Dublin printed: London re-printed: and sold by T. Cooper at the Globe in Pater-Noster-Row, 1738. 8vo in fours, pp. 22; complete with half title and final blank leaf; disbound. First London edition: first published in Dublin earlier the same year. This poem was written in 1732, but not published at that time. Swift explains the theme in a brief preface: 'The following Poem is grounded upon the universal Folly in Mankind, of mistaking their Talents; by which the Author doth a great Honour to his own Species, almost equalling them with certain Brutes; wherein, indeed, he is too partial, as he freely confesseth: and yet he hath gone as low as he well could, by specifying five Animals; the Wolf, the Ass, the Swine, the Ape and the Goat; all equally mischievous, except the last, who outdoes them in the Article of Cunning: so great is the Pride of Man'. The satire concludes with a reference to Gulliver and his 'Account of the Houyhnhnms': For, here he owns, that now and then Beasts may degen'rate into Men Foxon S806; Teerink 759. George Faulkner's Dublin printing of this poem is very rare; the London edition has itself become very difficult find. N° de réf. du vendeur 22209

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BLAKE, William, illustrator.

Edité par London: printed by T. Bensley Bolt Court for the proprietor R.H. Cromek. and sold by Cadell and Davies J. Johnson T. Payne etc. and Constable and co. Edinburgh (1808)

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About this Item: London: printed by T. Bensley Bolt Court for the proprietor R.H. Cromek. and sold by Cadell and Davies J. Johnson T. Payne etc. and Constable and co. Edinburgh, 1808. 4to (349 x 278mm), pp. xiv, 36, [4] advertisements; with engraved frontispiece, title page and eleven plates by William Blake; bound in early 19th century black boards, with black straight-grained morocco spine and corners; with gilt winged and crowned skull above crossed swords as cornerpieces on both covers; drab green endpapers. A fine copy of this classic of book illustration. Robert Blair's The Grave was first published in 1743, after a long gestation: it was a huge success, tapping into the vogue for 'graveyard' poetry, and was many times reprinted over the rest of the century. The fashion had still not abated by 1805, when Blake was commissioned by Robert Cromek to make designs for a new edition: Flaxman recorded that there were originally to be forty designs, but by the time of the prospectus (November 1805) this had been reduced to fifteen, and then twelve. The finished book was not in fact issued until the summer of 1808. The plates were etched by Louis Schiavonetti, after Cromek objected to Blake's own work in the engraving process: indeed, at one point Cromek had a prospectus printed which credited Schiavonetti with the entire work. There were two issues of the book: the folio which is much rarer, and the quarto, more usually met with. This is a very good copy of the quarto issue, with only a very little foxing, and a small area of staining at the outer top corner. It is also bound in an appropriately sombre binding, and has an attractive provenance. The title page showing a naked angel trumpeter awakening the sleeping skeleton is surely one of the most memorable and astonishing images in all nineteenth-century art. Bentley, Blake Books, 435B. Provenance: Thomas Gosden (1780-1843), with his fish-themed bookplate. Gosden is famous as the bibliographer of the art of angling, but he also bound books and it is just possible that he bound this himself. His very distinctive and lavish bindings on copies of Walton's Compleat Angler are notable examples of early Victoriana: decorating this book in a less weighty fashion might also have appealed to him. For an account of him, see Hobson, English Bindings in the Library of J.R. Abbey (1940), nos. 107 and 108; and Nixon, Five Centuries (1978), no. 88. N° de réf. du vendeur 22263

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GILLOT, Jacques.]

Edité par Paris? (1613)

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About this Item: Paris?, 1613. Large 8vo (228 x 150mm), pp. 371, [1] blank, [6] table; a good copy in contemporary French calf, centre of covers nicely gilt, spine with red morocco label; spine and corners a bit worn, with joints cracked. Second edition of a compilation of documents relating to the Council of Trent, presumably taken from the French royal papers - the French kings (Henri II, François II and Charles IX) had an intense interest in the council's deliberations and naturally would have wanted to influence the outcome. It was first published in 1608, and was the work of Jacques Gillot (1550?-1619). A priest, Gillot was a clerk-counsellor to the Parlement of Paris, and an opponent of the Jesuits in France; he was also a correspondent of Paolo Sarpi, the historian of the Council of Trent, and thus a sceptic of papal powers and prerogatives, and siding with royalty and secular rulers in church matters. He had a wide circle of friendship with the less orthodox intellectuals,corresponding with Joseph Scaliger and Isaac Casaubon among others. This copy has the inscription on the upper endpaper: 'Windsor Castle 16 August 1658. Oiseou xi elpiseou [graece]. Durate. Lauderdaill'. The same hand has written 'Lauderdaill' at the foot of the title page. These are both written by John Maitland, Earl (and later Duke) of Lauderdale, whilst he was imprisoned at Windsor during the last few years of the Commonwealth. Lauderdale's eventful life is too involved even to summarise here, but for the last nine years of the Commonwealth (1651-1660) he was in a series of prisons in England, at the pleasure of the protectorate authorities. Captured in Cheshire after the battle of Worcester in September 1651, he was held variously at Chester Castle, the Tower of London, Portland Castle and - for the last four years of his captivity - at Windsor Castle, where he enjoyed some liberty but had no hope of escape. Little has been written about Lauderdale's period of imprisonment, partly because little seems to be known: this central decade of his life occupies a mere chapter in biographies of him. Partly this must be because it was a period of political inactivity, and it is Lauderdale's politics which fascinate more than any other aspect of his complex life. He had been an influential figure in Scotland in the 1640s, and at the Restoration he was to have the King's ear for two decades, becoming a figure of hate to the whig historians who dominated English history from Gilbert Burnet onwards. If Lauderdale was out of power, he was not idle, either intellectually or religiously, for his letters to the puritan divine Richard Baxter (then at Kidderminster), written between February 1658 and March 1659, still survive and are amongst the Baxter MSS at Dr Williams's Library. They show him diligently reading in English, French and Spanish, clearly out of a desire to discover and justify his position on the great questions of church authority. The letters were written at exactly the time that he acquired this book - indeed, one letter, discussing books by Pierre du Moulin and David Blondel, was written the day after this inscription, 17 August, when he tells Baxter that he has a copy of Blondel, but that it is 'in my Librarie beyond sea: for my Librarie is safe and that is all hath scaped'. His letters to Baxter are, indeed, full of bookish talk: the next one, of 20 September, discusses not the death of the Protector (which had happened on the 3rd) but his search for a particular text: 'Fryday was spent in looking for the booke at Eton, and I was amazed not to find it in some good Libraries, especially seeing one of the owners of a very good one does understand French. On Saturday early I employed a servant to seek at London . In Pauls Churchyard it was not to be found ready bound'. He goes on to promise to find for him Les Libertés de l'Eglise Gallicane by Pierre Pithou, who had been a friend and collaborator of Gillot, commenting that 'when I was a dealer in bookes (for now I am but for small ware) it was very deare, wch spoke it much esteemed'. Lauderdale makes no mention of this present book, or of Gillot, but - given this context - it is easy to see it fitting into his studies, as well as its being a volume he would enjoy handling and reading. Perhaps this was one of the books his servant had acquired for him in London on an earlier trip. There is, alas, no indication of earlier or later ownership. The motto which Lauderdale has written is, presumably, not a family motto but one that reflects his current situation: the Greek seems to mean 'Suffer and hope', and 'Durate' presumably means 'Endure'. See F.J. Powicke, 'Eleven letters of John Second Earl of Lauderdale . to the Rev. Richard Baxter (1615-1691)', in Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 7 (1922-23), pp. 73-105. N° de réf. du vendeur 22545

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